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Case Study Title Organization Published
Advancing Sustainable Procurement and Improving Supplier Diversity Aflac 2015
Maximizing Stakeholder Engagement to Drive Positive Impact and Improvement Air Liquide 2019
Providing Energy Security to Fort Hood Apex Clean Energy 2017
Environmental Purchasing in the City of Phoenix Arizona State University 2019
A Journey Towards a More Sustainable & Transparent Paper Production Model Asia Pulp and Paper 2015
Sustainability Up and Down the Supply Chain – ASSA ABLOY’s Sustainable Procurement Journey ASSA ABLOY 2016
Green Public Procurement in the Basque Country Basque County 2018
Best Buy’s Change to Hybrid Geekmobiles Best Buy 2016
Food Service for a Sustainable Future Bon Appétit Management Co. 2018
Booz Allen Gets a Great Green Idea to Redirect Waste from Landfills Booz Allen Hamilton 2017
Wine Keg Program Caesars Entertainment 2017
Spend Analysis Pilot Project California’s State Spend for Fiscal Years 2012-15 California Department of General Services and Industrial Ecology Research Services (IERS) 2017
Kicking the Toxics Out of Office Furniture Center for Environmental Health 2017
China Government Procurement of Environmental Labelling Products China Environmental United Certification Center 2017
Citi’s Supply Chain Sustainability Program (2017) Citi 2017
Citi’s Supply Chain Sustainability Program (2015) Citi 2015
Citi’s Supply Chain Sustainability Program: Embedding supply chain sustainability into the supplier selection process Citi 2019
Green Business Certification Drives Green Purchasing Strategies City of Cupertino 2016
City of Markham City of Markham 2016
Implementing a Sustainable Procurement Policy City of Mississauga 2019
Cargo Trike Delivery of Office Supplies City of Portland 2015
Standardizing Around ENERGY STAR and EPEAT Office Electronics City of Portland 2015
LED Residential Street Lighting City of Portland 2015
On-Site Renewable Energy: Biogas City of Portland 2015
Greening CityFleet: Taking on Emission and Toxics Reduction Strategies City of Portland 2015
Sustainable Procurement Program Evolution through Strategic Planning City of Portland 2018
Custodial Supplies Management City of Portland, OR 2018
Office Furniture: Leveraging a Space Optimization Project for Advancing Less-Toxic Product Requirements City of Portland, Oregon 2019
Charging Ahead: Finding the Most Powerful Rechargeable Batteries City of San Francisco 2017
Meatless in March City of Santa Monica 2017
City of Vancouver Becomes a Certified Living Wage Employer City of Vancouver 2018
Healthy Furniture Contract Commonwealth of Massachusetts 2017
Massachusetts 2015 EPP Program Commonwealth of Massachusetts 2016
Solar PV Canopies provide substantial opportunity to rapidly meet state facility installed solar capacity goals Commonwealth of Massachusetts 2018
Compliance Support and Supplier Engagement Compliance Hub 2017
Con Edison Sustainable Supply Chain Success Con Edison 2018
Copy Paper Impact Reduction Initiative County of Alameda 2015
Trends in Climate Impacts of Public Agency Procurement: A Meta-Analysis County of Alameda 2015
Green Building Program County of Alameda 2016
Green and Healthy Events County of Alameda 2016
Green Impact, Locally Grown: Regional Sustainable Procurement Strategies with a Ripple Effect County of Alameda 2019
Dakota County Environmental Purchasing Initiatives: Making the Right Choices Financially and Environmentally Dakota County, MN 2018
Closed Loop Recycled Plastics Initiative Dell 2015
National and State Level Leadership in Sustainability Cohort to pilot the SPLC BENCHMARKS tool Department of General Services 2018
Responsiveness: How One Buyer is Using Renewable Energy to Meet Multiple Objectives Digital Realty Trust 2017
USAG Fort Lee Hazardous Material Management Program: Enterprise Environmental, Safety and Occupational Health- Management Information System Integration Directorate of Public Works Environmental Management Division 2019
Sustainable Purchasing Program District of Columbia 2016
DC Efforts to Institutionalize Sustainable Purchasing District of Columbia 2015
The Paper Trail: Digitizing Transparency Domtar Corporation 2015
Sustainable Supply Chain Tool EarthCheck and Banyan Tree Hotels & Resorts 2017
Innovating Toward Sustainability One Custodial Shift at a Time Ecolab 2015
Leveraging Data to Simplify and Streamline Sustainable Procurement Ecomedes 2017
Energizing Sustainability in ENOC Emirates National Oil Company 2019
Sustainable Food Initiative Emory University 2015
EPA’s Recommendations of Specification, Standards, and Ecolabels for Federal Purchasing Environmental Protection Agency 2018
A Leader in Driving Towards a Robust and Sustainable Electric Utility Industry Supply Chain EUISSCA 2017
Leveraging Joint Action to Scale Change at an Industry Level through Purchasing Fair Trade USA 2019
Federal Office Furniture Buying Guide Federal Furniture Mult-Agency Commodity Team 2016
Leveraging a Shared Services Model to Impact Sustainability FedEx 2017
Developing a Closed Loop Recycling System for Small Plastic Sort Bags FedEx 2017
Diesel Exhaust Fluid (DEF) Waste Reduction FedEx 2017
The Baddour Center FedEx 2017
Diesel to Electric – FedEx Ground Support Equipment FedEx 2018
ReUsable Core Stretchfilm FedEx 2019
FedEx Express Pickup and Delivery Fleet Electrification FedEx Corporate Services, Inc. 2019
Ford’s Partnership for A Cleaner Environment (PACE) Program Ford Motor Company 2016
Labor and Human Rights Green Electronics Council 2018
GEC Guide on Sustainable Cloud Computing Helps Purchasers Realize and Capture Sustainability Gains Green Electronics Council 2019
The GEC Environmental Benefits Calculator enhances purchaser ability to quantify the benefits of purchasing EPEAT products Green Electronics Council 2019
Benefits of Multi-Attribute Sustainable Product Certification GreenCircle Certified, LLC 2015
Avoiding Chemical Flame Retardants Harvard University 2016
University Procurement Mobilizing for Ethical Labor Standards Harvard University 2018
Kicking Flame Retardant Chemicals Out of Office Furniture HDR 2015
Sustainable Marketing Execution HH Global 2019
Organic Waste Diversion Hilton 2017
Sustainable Landscaping Solution Hilton 2017
Hilton Corporate Wide Mattress Recycling Program Diverts 1,000,000+ Pounds of Waste Hilton Supply Management 2018
Bringing Sustainability Full Circle: HP’s Circular Economy Journey HP 2017
Top 8 Sustainability Criteria Enabling Circular Economy in Supplies Procurement HP Inc 2018
Closing the Loop with Ocean-Bound Plastics from Haiti HP Inc. 2019
Increasing Participation of Micro & Small Enterprises in Public Procurement Indian Railways 2017
Forwarding More Responsible Mining Initiative for Responsible Mining Assurance 2016
Lowering risks for purchasing mined materials Initiative for Responsible Mining Assurance 2019
Connecting Environmentally and Socially Responsible Businesses Around the World Intengine Enterprises, Inc. 2019
Supplier Selection and Engagement for Developing Innovative and More Sustainable Products: An Interface Case Study on Luxury Vinyl Flooring Interface 2019
Achieving Mission Zero through Supply Chain Collaboration Interface, Inc. 2018
Utilization of Biomethane to Reduce Carbon Emissions: A Case Study with Interface Interface, Inc. & Element Markets 2018
The Electronics Challenge International Campaign for Responsible Technology & GoodElectronics Network 2016
Building the Business Case for Sustainable Procurement in Australia – Guidance ISO 20400 Australian Mirror Committee 2019
Johnson & Johnson Sustainable Procurement Program Johnson & Johnson 2018
Green Public Procurement of South Korea KEITI 2015
Solar Security Lighting for Metro Bus Shelters King County 2017
King County’s Long-term Renewable Electricity Purchase King County 2017
West Point Treatment Plant Renewable Energy – Purchasing Partnerships King County 2015
King County Metro Transit’s First All-Electric Battery-Powered Bus King County 2016
King County Metro Transit Fleet Purchases Advance Public Transportation Sustainability King County 2015
A Leading Light: King County Lighting Replacement King County Department of Natural Resources and Parks 2019
Purchasing Liquid Petroleum Gas Vehicles for King County’s Fleet King County Department of Transportation 2016
Uncharted Waters: Waterless Car Washing Services in King County King County Department of Transportation 2018
Celebrating 30 Years of Sustainable Purchasing King County Procurement 2019
King County’s Environmental Purchasing Program King County’s Environmental Purchasing Program 2015
Improving Program Effectiveness: Turning Data into Action Lawrence Berkely National Lab 2016
Cast a Wider Net: Advancing Inclusive and Sustainable Hiring Lifeworks 2019
Small Business Strong Lockheed Martin 2015
Returnable, Reusable Containers and Fixtures Lockheed Martin 2015
Better Plants Program Lockheed Martin 2016
A Rewarding Precious Metals Spot Lockheed Martin 2016
Supplier Diversity Program Lockheed Martin 2016
Lockheed’s Sustainable Purchasing Program Lockheed Martin 2016
Lockheed Martin Spend Analysis Lockheed Martin 2015
Toward the Shared Value Vector: Lockheed Martin Sustainable Purchasing Program Lockheed Martin 2015
Sustainable Ethics Mentoring Program Lockheed Martin 2015
E-waste Stewardship Lockheed Martin 2015
Standard Unlocks Sustainability Lockheed Martin 2019
Building Supplier Capability Lockheed Martin Corporation 2018
Diversion, Reverse Logistics and Upcycling – the initial steps towards Circularity. Looptworks 2019
John Ferraro Building Efficiency Case Study Los Angeles Department of Water and Power 2019
LADWP’s Evolving Sustainable Supply Chain Program Los Angeles Department of Water and Power 2019
5 Year Sustainable Procurement Strategy McGill University 2016
Microsoft Contact Center Strategic Suppliers Microsoft 2015
Climate Change Leadership through Collaboration and Capacity Building Microsoft and CDP 2019
Environmental Purchasing in Healthcare: Turning Big Data Into Useful Information Mindclick 2017
mindful MATERIALS: collaborative transformation mindful MATERIALS 2019
Molson Coors Advances Innovative Supplier Diversity Initiative Molson Coors 2018
Select Supplier Sustainability Assessment Monsanto 2018
Enterprise Resource Planning System RFP Project Management Team Multnomah County 2017
Sustainable Procurement in Laboratories: It’s Time to ACT. My Green Lab 2018
The New York State Green Procurement and Agency Sustainability Program New York State 2017
NRG Energy: Creating value through supply chain transparency and engagement NRG 2019
NSF 391.1 General Sustainability Assessment Criteria for Professional Services Standard NSF International 2019
Expanding Sustainability in your Business System Office Depot 2017
Advancing Sustainability by Engaging Customers Office Depot 2015
Creating Ownership for Sustainability in Large, Ever-Changing Organizations Office Depot 2019
Using a Public Bond Measure and the Construction Manager/General Contractor (CM/GC) process to expand conservation education and instill sustainability throughout the Oregon Zoo Oregon Zoo / Multnomah County 2019
PG&E’s Supply Chain Responsibility Program Pacific Gas & Electric 2017
Street Light Replacement Pacific Gas & Electric 2017
V-gard GREEN Hard Hat Pacific Gas & Electric 2017
PG&E The Sustainability Project Web-Based Tool Pacific Gas & Electric 2018
PG&E Expands Sustainability Education for Suppliers Pacific Gas & Electric 2019
PG&E Concrete Repair Innovation Pacific Gas & Electric 2019
Carbon Neutrality: How Philips’ Procurement & Sustainability Teams Delivered Results Philips 2016
LEED-ing the Way to Market Transformation: Portland State University and Miller Paint Portland State University 2018
Partnering for Sustainability – Creating a Sustainable Supply Chain Collaboratively Procter & Gamble 2018
Sustainable Procurement in Nova Scotia − Furniture Case Study Province of Nova Scotia 2015
The Railway Industry’s First Sustainable Procurement Initiative Railsponsible 2017
Turning the Ship: How One Supplier’s Agility led to its Market Evolution Renewable Choice Energy 2016
Right to Repair Case Study Repair Association 2018
Model Green Lighting Equipment Contract Responsible Purchasing Network 2019
Creation of a Multi-State Green Cleaning Supplies Contract by Massachusetts and New York State Responsible Purchasing Network and Commonwealth of Massachusetts 2016
Creation of the USDN-RPN Sustainable Procurement Playbook for Cities Responsible Purchasing Network and Urban Sustainability Directors Network 2017
Scaling the circular economy with modern asset management technology Rheaply 2019
Green Deal Circular Procurement Rijkwaterstaat 2018
Small Town ‘Rust Belt’ Economic Sustainability and Development Roppe Holding 2016
Sustainable Supplier Performance – Increased transparency, collaboration and commitment drive structural impact Royal Philips 2018
Transforming Commitment to Impact: How Shaw and the United Nations Global Compacts is Transforming Sustainable Sourcing Shaw Industries 2018
What if Carpet Never had to be Sent to the Landfill? Shaw Industries Group, Inc. 2017
Sodexo: Local Sourcing as a Pathway to Impact Sourcing Sodexo 2018
Sodexo’s Vermont First Program: Growing Market Opportunity for Local Producers Sodexo 2019
Supplier Engagement at Sonoco Sonoco 2016
Sonoco’s Journey to Sustainable Purchasing Leadership Sonoco 2019
Measuring What Matters: Using Innovative Product Performance Evaluation Software Sphere E 2015
Integrating EPP into California’s eProcurement Process State of California 2016
Open Office Panels System State of California Department of General Services 2015
State of California’s Leadership in Sustainable Purchasing State of California Department of General Services 2015
Combined Approaches for Increasing Diversity and Inclusion State of Minnesota 2017
Interagency Collaboration on Sustainable Purchasing State of Minnesota 2016
Building the sustainability capacity of small, minority, woman, economically disadvantaged, and veteran-owned businesses State of Minnesota 2018
Establishing a Formal Sustainable Procurement Program State of Minnesota 2018
Sustainable Office Furniture on NASPO ValuePoint Participating Agreement and MINNCOR Industries Contract State of Minnesota 2019
Energy-Efficient Purchasing Tracking State of Tennessee 2016
Leading Human Rights Due Diligence in Global Supply Chains Through Public Procurement – the Case of the Swedish County Councils and IT Supply Chains Stockholm County Council 2017
Superior Essex West Baden Springs Hotel Superior Essex 2018
Supplier Capacity Building: A Collaborative Pilot Using the Sustrana Platform Sustrana 2018
Surgical Glove Manufacturing in Malaysia – the Case of the Swedish County Councils Swedish County Council 2017
Form Policy to Progress Measuring Social Responsibility Improvement in IT Product Manufacturing TCO Development 2017
TCO Certified, generation 8. Helping IT purchasers drive product circularity, chemical transparency and supply chain responsibility. TCO Development 2019
Tessy Plastics, A Supplier’s Sustainability Journey Stg Tessy Plastics 2018
Increasing the share of WBE in a Corporate Supply Chain The World Bank Group 2018
Collaboration Drives Sustainability, Efficiently, in the Chemical Industry Together for Sustainability and EcoVadis 2016
Ecolabel Builds Synergies Between Value Chain Actors to Accomplish Sustainable Procurement Goal: A Case from Telecom Industry. TUV Rheinland 2018
The USDA Voluntary Biobased Labeling Program U.S. Department of Agriculture 2015
U.S. Department of Energy GreenBuy Award Program U.S. Department of Energy 2015
UN Environment: 10 years of action to accelerate the shift to Sustainable public procurement at national, regional and global levels UN Environment 2018
Sustainable Procurement United Nations Development Programme 2018
University of California – Sustainable Procurement Policy Updates, Quantitative Metrics, Governance Structures and Approval University of California 2018
Procurement & Sustainability Partnership: Energy Efficient Research Freezers University of California, Office of the President 2017
A Collaborative Approach to Supplier Sustainability Assessments University of California, San Diego 2015
A case study of the Biochemistry Cell Culture Facility at the University of Colorado Boulder: avoided costs and other benefits resulting from shared equipment in collaborative research space University of Colorado, Boulder 2019
Ultra-Low Temperature (ULT) Freezer Efficiency Program University of Pennsylvania 2016
Anchor Institutions and Small Businesses Implementing Sustainable Solutions University of Pennsylvania & Wash Cycle Laundry 2017
U.S. Forest Service Region 5 Carport-Mounted Solar Photovoltaic System: A Lesson in Aggregated Procurement USDA Forest Service 2019
Corporate Paper Program VF Corporation 2017
Cleaning Products VF Corporation 2018
Fabric Scrap Recovery VF Corporation 2018
Indirect Procurement Sustainability Program VF Corporation 2018
Travis Perkins Group Multiple Sustainability Impact Spend Analysis VitalMetrics/IERS 2015
U.S. General Services Administration Spend Analysis VitalMetrics/IERS 2015
Setting the Industry Standard: Implementing Environmentally Preferred Attributes Across Healthcare Vizient 2019
Zero Waste Challenge Waste Management 2016
Corporate Value Chain (Scope 3) Standard World Resources Institute & World Business Council for Sustainable Development 2016

 

Abstracts

Click on the title links to download the full case studies as PDFs.


Advancing Sustainable Procurement and Improving Supplier Diversity

Organization: Aflac

Contact: Japen Hollist

Download: Full Case Study PDF

Abstract:

In the summer of 2012 Aflac launched several RFPs in both Information Technology and Marketing that resulted in the replacement of incumbent diverse suppliers with non-diverse suppliers. The drop in diverse spend was an unintended consequence. Upon realizing the impact of these changes, Aflac executives devised several strategies to identify, mentor, and maintain a diverse supply base. This case study chronicles lessons learned from one of those strategies, hosting Aflac’s first Supplier Diversity Summit. Together, Aflac’s strategies resulted in an improvement from 4% diverse spending in 2012 to 10.8% in 2015, without compromising on cost competitiveness or performance satisfaction.


Maximizing Stakeholder Engagement to Drive Positive Impact and Improvement

2019 SPLC Leadership Award Winner – Best Overall Program

Organization: Air Liquide

Contact: Feng Zheng, Sustainable Collaborative Procurement Manager, Air Liquide and Shui Mahieu, Sustainable Procurement Manager, Air Liquide

Download: Full Case Study PDF

Abstract:

The Group Air Liquide attaches great importance to the ability of its suppliers to offer long-term partnerships and to ensure a high level of safety, reliability, competitiveness and innovation, while guaranteeing that Ethics, Human Rights and Sustainable Development are taken into account.

Since 2009, the Group has been collaborating with EcoVadis to deploy its worldwide Sustainable Procurement (“SP”) Program, governed by a Group Procedure GP08 covering comprehensively all its geographies and business units.


Providing Energy Security to Fort Hood

2017 SPLC Leadership Award Winner – Business Case

Organization: Apex Clean Energy

Contact: Melissa Peterson

Download: Full Case Study PDF

Abstract:

Cotton Plains Wind and Phantom Solar (collectively, the complex) is a combined 65.8 MW hybrid renewable energy generation facility originated by Apex Clean Energy (Apex) that will supply energy to U.S. Army Garrison Fort Hood (Fort Hood) in Killeen, Texas. Cotton Plains Wind, which is currently operating in Floyd County, Texas, is capable of generating up to 50.4 MW of homegrown wind energy, enough to satisfy approximately 200,000 MWh of Fort Hood’s electricity demand each year. Phantom Solar is under construction on-site at Fort Hood, with an expected completion in April 2017. The complex—which is the Army’s largest single renewable energy project to date—is expected to save the Department of Defense (DoD) about $168 million compared to what it would pay for power from the traditional electricity grid over the course of the 28-year renewable energy supply agreement (RESA) with Apex.


Environmental Purchasing in the City of Phoenix

Organization: Arizona State University

Contact: Nicole Darnall

Download: Full Case Study PDF

Abstract:

U.S. local governments purchase $1.72 trillion of goods and services annually that contribute to global climate change and other environmental problems. Cities that successfully implement environmental purchasing policies can mitigate these environmental concerns while saving money and demonstrating their environmental leadership. However, cities confront numerous challenges when implementing an environmental purchasing policy. This case identifies the facilitators and barriers of implementing an environmental purchasing policy. It draws on the experiences within the City of Phoenix as an example and offers eight recommendations for how the City of Phoenix and similar cities can integrate environmental purchasing more fully into their existing purchasing processes.


A Journey Towards a More Sustainable & Transparent Paper Production Model

Organization: Asia Pulp and Paper

Contact: Michael McManus

Download: Full Case Study PDF

Abstract:

Asia Pulp and Paper Group (APP) is one of the world’s largest pulp and paper manufacturers whose products touch the lives of millions of consumers every single day. Over several years, the company was the target of campaigns directed by NGOs, including Greenpeace, who wanted the company to end natural forest clearance in its supply chain. APP’s management recognized the company needed to change in order to ensure the business was sustainable and could operate well into the future. By collaborating with several stakeholders, a major breakthrough was achieved as APP launched its Forest Conservation Policy. Under the FCP, among several other achievements, the keystone was an immediate end to natural forest clearance, switching instead to a reliance on responsibly managed pulpwood plantations. This comprehensive “zero deforestation” commitment was driven by several stakeholders, but above all, success would only be achieved through a new transparency model. How did APP achieve major sustainable change via transparent checks and balances? This case study presents a broad overview of the beginning of that transformation.


Sustainability Up and Down the Supply Chain – ASSA ABLOY’s Sustainable Procurement Journey

Organization: ASSA ABLOY

Contact: Amy Vigneux

Download: Full Case Study PDF

Abstract:

Through a concerted effort and by the leadership of Amy Vigneux and others, ASSA ABLOY has ensured its role as a sustainable product provider and worked to increase sustainable purchasing at all levels of their organization. ASSA ABLOY has conducted extensive work with their supply chain, including supply chain audits of over 1000 suppliers which has been intended to help ASSA ABLOY reach their strict supplier requirements. What started as a market reaction to their customers’ demands, ASSA ABLOY’s work has led them to an extended focus and own internal goals to improve their operations, create sustainable goods and provide transparency to the market place to help aid their customers in better buying decisions. ASSA ABLOY has made extensive strides in meeting various purchaser sustainable supply chain mandates through developments in Sustainable Product Innovation, publishing transparency documents (such as Environmental Product Declarations and Health Product Declarations), achieving multi-attribute third-party validation of the sustainability attributes of their products and operations, as well as decreasing their environmental impact across all North American manufacturing facilities.


Green Public Procurement in the Basque Country

Organization: Basque County

Contact: Gorane Ibarra González

Download: Full Case Study PDF

Abstract:

The Government of the Basque Country (one of the regions of the State of Spain) has been promoting green public procurement for more than ten years and in 2016 approved its most recent policy on the field, the Green Public Procurement Program of the Basque Country 2020 (GPP 2020 Program).

This program represents a qualitative leap forward, compared to the previous one, as it encourages the participation of the whole Basque public sector (not only the Basque central government) and defines a systematic implementation of GPP consisting on: appointing GPP focal points within each authority; requiring the definition of annual GPP plans for 20 priority “product” categories; demanding the analysis and integration of GPP in regular procurement procedures and tools; and monitoring achieved results.

The overall target is to achieve at least 50% of green public procurement for the 20 priority “product” categories and the GPP 2020 Program includes almost 20 activities to support authorities in this endeavor (including training, development of common tools, coordination with the market, etc.).


Best Buy’s Change to Hybrid Geekmobiles

Organization: Best Buy

Contact: Tim Meester

Download: Full Case Study PDF

Abstract:

Best Buy’s Geek Squad is a national organization of more than 20,000 Agents who visit clients’ homes more than 5 million times a year to help customers get the most from their technology. The Geekmobile is a highly recognized expression of the Geek Squad brand.

Since 2004, the Geekmobile has been a Volkswagen Beetle. This project transitioned Geekmobiles from the Beetle to the Toyota Prius c, exemplifying Best Buy’s understanding and commitment to the environment and economic impacts of our purchasing. Further, this project brings measurable environmental and economic results.


Food Service for a Sustainable Future

Organization: Bon Appétit Management Co.

Contact: Bonnie Powell

Download: Full Case Study PDF

Abstract:

Bon Appétit Management Company was founded in 1987 by CEO Fedele Bauccio to revolutionize contract food service by offering restaurant-quality food, cooked from scratch by trained chefs. Our path toward greater sustainability started as a quest for flavor. When you cook everything from scratch, you want the freshest ingredients. That led us to launch our Farm to Fork program back in 1999 — long before “locavore” entered the dictionary. Working directly with farmers and ranchers opened our eyes to the many problems of our modern food supply. That inspired the company’s tagline, “food service for a sustainable future,” which we define as “Flavorful food that’s healthy and economically viable for all, produced through practices that respect farmers, workers, and animals; nourish the community; and replenish our shared natural resources for future generations.”

For almost two decades we’ve been a pioneer in socially and environmentally responsible sourcing policies, with commitments to local purchasing, appropriate use of antibiotics in agriculture, sustainable seafood, the food–climate change connection (including to fighting food waste), humanely raised meat and eggs, and farmworkers’ rights. This case study will document the history, breadth, and depth of our commitments and quantify the impact of our sustainable purchasing program, which depends on the commitment and passion of 18,000 Bon Appétit employees.


Booz Allen Gets a Great Green Idea to Redirect Waste from Landfills

Organization: Booz Allen Hamilton

Contact: Elizabeth Wayt

Download: Full Case Study PDF

Abstract:

Booz Allen applies sustainable practices to our operations, provides solutions to our clients, and engages communities through staff volunteer efforts, while involving our people throughout the process. This case study represents a situation where employees saw the need for reducing waste, submitted an idea, and our Strategic Sourcing team helped implement the solution.

Booz Allen has a tradition of providing hot beverages to our staff. When the firm switched from a multi-servings coffee pot system to an individual beverage packet system, people loved the options, but hated the trash it generated. The winner of a firm-sponsored “Great Green Ideas” competition offered a solution to reduce this new waste stream – an upcycling process. This process resulted in a drastic reduction in waste otherwise destined for a landfill. Since the program’s inception in October 2010, nearly 6.5 million packets have been processed, with nearly 50 tons of used packets upcycled into new consumer products. The firm also participated in a pilot program where the used packets were converted to energy via a waste-to-energy program, and over 64,516 kilowatts of power have been generated through this program since it began in January 2012.


Wine Keg Program

Organization: Caesars Entertainment

Contact: Michelle Bianchi Griffith

Download: Full Case Study PDF

Abstract:

At Caesars Entertainment, we are committed to driving environmental sustainability through our supply chain, including the way we contract with more than 13,000 of our vendors. One of the three areas of our procurement that presents the highest risks, and the greatest opportunities for sustainability improvements in our supply chain, is beverage packaging. In 2011, we launched the wine keg program, eliminating the need for wine bottles and associated waste for four varietals – Chardonnay, Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon, and Sauvignon Blanc – in bars, event venues, and gaming floors. In 2016, we eliminated the need for 65,130 wine bottles, avoiding 97.7 tons of glass, 5,427.5 cardboard boxes, 65,130 corks, and capsules of waste and recyclables. We hope that our program can serve as a model for other vendors hoping to scale innovative approaches to wine delivery systems.


Spend Analysis Pilot Project California’s State Spend for Fiscal Years 2012-15

2017 SPLC Leadership Award Winner – Special Initiative

Organization: California Department of General Services and Industrial Ecology Research Services (IERS)

Contact: Charleen Fain-Keslar

Download: Full Case Study PDF

Abstract:

The state of California purchases billions of dollars of goods and services every year, and funds a wide variety of activities throughout the state. As the world’s sixth largest economy and with strong environmental leadership, it has a significant opportunity to advance sustainable purchasing. The Department of General Services (DGS) participated in a two-year spend analysis pilot project using a life cycle assessment (LCA) approach to estimate the environmental impacts of over $97 billion of state spending from 2012 to 2015, which included over 300,000 individual line items and over 12,000 different commodities. This case study describes the project, steps and key results achieved.


Kicking the Toxics Out of Office Furniture

2017 SPLC Leadership Award Winner – Market Transformation

Organization: Center for Environmental Health

Contact: Judy Levin

Download: Full Case Study PDF

Abstract:

CEH engaged in a 2 ½ year effort to leverage the buying power of large purchasers from a wide variety of sectors to move the furniture industry towards offering safer products. Specifically, CEH was interested in reducing the use of specific harmful chemicals commonly found in furniture (nicknamed the “Hazardous Handful”): flame-retardants, fluorinated stain treatments, antimicrobials, formaldehyde and PVC. CEH developed a practical set of tools and resources that are needed by purchasers and provided technical assistance, at no cost, to purchasers who were interested in purchasing furniture without these chemicals.

Additionally, CEH worked within BIFMA to help develop a criterion for their new level standard that provides a clear and easy way to help purchasers identify and specify healthier products. Lastly, CEH provided assistance to states working on a multi-state cooperative buying agreement and helped insert environmental criteria into their RFI and RFP. As a result of CEH’s work, more than $650 million in purchasing power has been driven to preferable products. This is a very conservative estimate as some private purchasers or States are reticent or unable to sign a Purchaser Pledge but are still driving their dollars towards safer products. If we were to include those spends, our total would likely be over $1 billion in purchasing power.


China Government Procurement of Environmental Labelling Products

Organization: China Environmental United Certification Center

Contact: Zhang Xiaohui

Download: Full Case Study PDF

Abstract:

Government procurement of environmental labelling products aims at promoting green procurement in China. China’s policy on government procurement of environmental labelling products has been improving over the past 10 years with a wider scope of products and a gradual improvement of the management mechanism. It plays a good guiding and demonstration role in facilitating comprehensive implementation of sustainable consumption. The policy on government procurement of environmental labelling products not only improves environmental performance of government agencies, but also reduces energy consumption and emissions of pollutants by forcing green upgrading of enterprises through consumption. Government procurement of environmental labelling products reached 715.45 billion Yuan during 2008~2016 with a continuous rise of environmental labelling products in similar products of government procurement.


Citi’s Supply Chain Sustainability Program (2017)

Organization: Citi

Contact: Christopher Santos

Download: Full Case Study PDF

Abstract:

Citi’s mission is to serve as a trusted partner to our clients by responsibly providing financial services that enable growth and economic progress. Incorporating the principles of sustainability into everything we do improves our own operations, enhances our clients’ work, and contributes to a better world. Reducing the environmental impacts of our facilities and supply chain is a critical pillar of our sustainability strategy, and the budget of this case study.


Citi’s Supply Chain Sustainability Program (2015)

Organization: Citi

Contact: Patricia Chico

Download: Full Case Study PDF

Abstract:

For more than 200 years, Citi’s mission has been to enable progress by facilitating economic growth and financing transformative projects. The core mission hasn’t changed, but the way we approach it has. Incorporating the principles of sustainability into everything we do improves our own operations, enhances our clients’ work, and contributes to a better world. Our sustainable supply chain approach incorporates the belief that our suppliers should meet high standards in environmental and social performance, as Citi strives to do. Partnering with our suppliers is critical to meeting our expense management objectives as well as our goal to promote environmental and social progress. Citi scales its environmental impact by helping empower suppliers to promote sustainability within their businesses. Our Supply Chain Sustainability program attempts to create mutually beneficial supplier relationships that achieve environmental, social and governance objectives. See our Statement of Supplier Principles and the Citi Standards for Suppliers for more information. Between the tools used, the Corporate Responsibility Questionnaire (CRQ) serves as a tool to evaluate the health of the supply chain of Citi’s suppliers. Citi is expanding its efforts to strengthen its supplier related data and including this information into the supplier selection process. The case study includes lessons learned as well as key success factors for this implementation.


Citi’s Supply Chain Sustainability Program: Embedding supply chain sustainability into the supplier selection process

Organization: Citi

Contact: Christopher Santos

Download: Full Case Study PDF

Abstract:

Citi’s mission is to serve as a trusted partner to our clients by responsibly providing financial services that enable growth and economic progress. Incorporating the principles of sustainability into everything we do improves our own operations, enhances our clients’ work, and contributes to a better world. Reducing the environmental impacts of our facilities and supply chain is a critical pillar of our sustainability strategy, and the budget of this case study.


Green Business Certification Drives Green Purchasing Strategies

Organization: City of Cupertino

Contact: Lauren Dickinson

Download: Full Case Study PDF

Abstract:

The City of Cupertino activated the statewide Green Business Certification Program (greenbusinessca.org) as a tool to both reinvigorate its dated Environmentally Preferable Procurement Policy, originally adopted in 2007, and engage small to mid-size businesses in their own efforts to institutionalize and apply green purchasing practices.

In attaining the program’s certification requirements, Cupertino realized the challenges the agency faced in employing a decentralized “Just in Time” approach to supply procurement mirrored that of its business partners. This enabled the City to create useful tools and solutions that reduced costs and achieved environmental gains, not just for the agency but also for prospective Green Business Program participants. Cupertino continues to strive towards more detailed tracking methods of green procurement practices.


City of Markham

Organization: City of Markham

Contact: Alison Toscano

Download: Full Case Study PDF

Abstract:

The City of Markham is a large municipality located in the GTA with a population of over 340,000 people. This diverse and growing city has shown dedication towards reducing carbon emissions for years, and their most recent Greenprint plan has pledged to reach “net zero energy, water, waste and emissions by 2050,” a goal that, if met, would make Markham one of the most energy efficient, environmentally friendly municipalities in North America. To get this plan underway the city council of Markham focused on three major areas including; replacing outdated technology with more efficient tech (ex. LED streetlights, new vending machines), ensuring that new building projects meet energy efficiency standards, and investing in renewable energy sources. Markham has undertaken over 90 projects since the Greenprint strategy was devised in 2011, and is an excellent example of the steps a large municipality can take to improve their energy consumption overall.


Implementing a Sustainable Procurement Policy

Organization: City of Mississauga

Contact: Natalie Adams

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Abstract:

In January 2018, Mississauga began implementing their Sustainable Procurement Policy. The policy was designed to give staff the resources and knowhow to implement sustainable purchasing, identify the low-hanging fruit of potential green purchases, and identify and execute on high-impact procurements. In addition, Mississauga’s procurement policy aimed to standardize and consistently apply sustainable procurement criteria as well as to implement procedures designed to measure progress made towards continuous improvement and accountability. With transparency in mind, the City also wished to keep the public informed on its sustainable procurement initiatives through updated information on its website. With this policy came a three-year implementation plan, the hire of a full time resource and a commitment to provide training to all staff involved in purchasing.


Cargo Trike Delivery of Office Supplies

Organization: City of Portland

Contact: Stacey Foreman

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Abstract:

In 2010 the City of Portland worked with their office supplies contractor to switch a portion of their office supply deliveries from traditional delivery trucks to delivery by cargo trike. This case study provides an overview of the benefits, costs, performance, and lessons learned associated with utilizing this alternative form of transport.


LED Residential Street Lighting

Organization: City of Portland

Contact: Stacey Foreman

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Abstract:

The City of Portland is currently in the process of upgrading all of its residential street lighting technology from high pressure sodium to LED technology. This case study provides an overview of the approach, costs, funding, performance and lessons learned associated with this project.


On-Site Renewable Energy: Biogas

Organization: City of Portland

Contact: Stacey Foreman

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Abstract:

Over the past decade the City of Portland’s Bureau of Environmental Services has tested a variety of technologies to capture and use the anaerobic digester gas produced at its Columbia Boulevard Wastewater Treatment Plant. This case study provides an overview of their use of reciprocating engine generator technology to generate electricity from the biogas, including insights on cost, funding, performance, and lessons learned.


Greening CityFleet: Taking on Emission and Toxics Reduction Strategies

Organization: City of Portland

Contact: Stacey Foreman

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Abstract:

The City of Portland has aggressive goals for reducing carbon emissions from City operations. This case study provides an overview of the various vehicle technologies CityFleet is utilizing to meet both carbon emission and toxics reduction goals, including insights on costs, funding, performance and lessons learned.


Sustainable Procurement Program Evolution through Strategic Planning

Organization: City of Portland

Contact: Stacey Foreman

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Abstract:

In 2017 the City of Portland’s Sustainable Procurement Program celebrated its 15th year. To mark the occasion, the Sustainable Procurement Program seized an opportunity for continuous improvement by taking the time and money to engage stakeholders, reflect on priorities, and develop the Program’s first Strategic Plan. Although the City’s Sustainable Procurement Program can claim numerous achievements from over the years, the 2017 strategic planning process was invaluable in terms of reengaging stakeholders and preparing the Sustainable Procurement Program to be more effective as sustainable procurement evolves.


Custodial Supplies Management

Organization: City of Portland, OR

Contact: Stacey Foreman

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Abstract:

In 2012 the City of Portland’s Sustainable Procurement Program launched an initiative to test whether switching from custodial supplies provided by the City’s custodial service provider to City-provided custodial supplies would improve the consistency in using green cleaning products, build transparency, and save money. The 5-year initiative proved that combining strategic sourcing methods, good project management, and green cleaning best practices results a multitude of benefits. By seeking and achieving benefits beyond green product acquisition, this project earned strong support from stakeholders.


Office Furniture: Leveraging a Space Optimization Project for Advancing Less-Toxic Product Requirements

Organization: City of Portland, Oregon

Contact: Stacey Foreman

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Abstract:

In 2017, the City began a major renovation of the Portland Building, where over 1,500 City staff work. Although the primary objectives of the renovation involved addressing a failing building envelope and improving its seismic performance, the renovation afforded an opportunity to also optimize space to increase building occupancy. To achieve this, the City decided to invest in new office furniture for the entire building, replacing existing furniture that was over 30 years old and a variety of types and sizes. Because this was such a significant purchase, the City took the opportunity to address two additional goals: furniture standardization and stronger human health furniture attributes.


Charging Ahead: Finding the Most Powerful Rechargeable Batteries

Organization: City of San Francisco

Contact: Chris Geiger

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Abstract:

In 2015-6, the San Francisco Department of the Environment commissioned a research project to address some key questions relating to the use of household rechargeable batteries: What technologies are available? Which are the highest performing? What purchasing criteria can be used to ensure the highest performance batteries available for City purchasers? What are the cost impacts?

Working with the Responsible Purchasing Network (RPN), the Department was able to identify a winning technology (low-self discharge nickel-metal hydride) and establish standards for power density and self-discharge rate that could be applied in City contracting. In addition, RPN reviewed a long list of available brands to make a short list of the highest performing models. This work paves the way for more effective contracting and more compelling outreach to purchasers in San Francisco and beyond.


Meatless in March

Organization: City of Santa Monica

Contact: Karl Bruskotter

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Abstract:

The City of Santa Monica’s City Council committed to a sustainable food policy and signed on to the Cool Foods Pledge. The City identified the over-consumption of meat and dairy as one of the primary drivers in climate, water and land use, poor health, and animal welfare and sought to reduce its foodprint in this area. This extended to its sustainable procurement effort, which identified sustainable food as a critical part of a leadership sustainable procurement program. Addressing this purchase, especially considering the purchases are decentralized and subject to individual choice of which the City has limited degree of influence, demonstrates leadership and innovation.

In 2015, the city introduced the “Meatless in March” campaign to motivate and challenge employees to explore eating more plant based meals to reduce environmental impacts and to improve their own personal health. To participate, employees signed a pledge and then tracked their meatless meals. Numerous strategies were implemented in order to maximize participation including social marketing, educational events, email reminders, and raffles. Resulting participation in March of 2015 and 2016 resulted in:

  • Saving 748 animals
  • Preventing 6,060 pounds of carbon dioxide from being released
  • Reducing over 2 million gallons of water

As employee meals are generally not purchased by the City, this is a case study of taking leadership to change the purchasing behavior of others, in this case, employees.


City of Vancouver Becomes a Certified Living Wage Employer

Organization: City of Vancouver

Contact: Alexander Ralph

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Abstract:

As of May 1, 2017, the City of Vancouver became a certified living wage employer to deliver on its Healthy City Strategy and commitment to help individuals and families make ends meet.

Vancouver is the largest city in Canada to commit to paying its direct employees and contracted services employees a living wage. The living wage is the hourly rate required for two working adults to meet the basic needs of a family of four in a specific region. It is calculated annually by the Living Wage for Families Campaign (LWFC).

The initiative began with a September 2016 commitment from Vancouver’s City Council and the approval of an aggressive time line for implementation. A cross-functional team, led by Supply Chain Management (SCM) worked to implement the policy over the course of 8 months. The short timeframe required concentrated staff effort to complete the steps to certification. The City revised the Corporate Procurement Policy to include Living Wage requirements under the Sustainable Procurement section. Vancouver also rolled out communications and engagement with staff, union, vendor, and public stakeholders.

Rapid implementation of the Living Wage program has already positively impacted workers’ lives: To date some contracts have been extended and renegotiated at living wage rates. In 2018, two large contracts for industries identified as vulnerable sectors will be fully compliant with the living wage policy.


Healthy Furniture Contract

Organization: Commonwealth of Massachusetts

Contact: Julia Wolfe

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Abstract:

This year marks the 20th anniversary of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts’ Environmentally Preferable Products Procurement Program (EPP Program). The Program’s primary goal is to leverage the Commonwealth’s purchasing power to procure goods and services that have a lesser or reduced negative effect on human health and the environment when compared with competing products or services that serve the same purpose. Since the Program’s inception, thousands of EPPs have been incorporated into more than 40 Statewide Contracts (SWCs) and the state’s purchases of these goods and services have grown from $5 million in 1994 to more than $385 million in Fiscal Year 2015 (FY2015). Massachusetts is one of the few states that supports a dedicated staff person in the procurement program to facilitate environmentally preferable product (EPP) and service purchases. The efforts led by Massachusetts over the last 20 years have helped raise the bar on the quality, cost, and availability of EPPs and also have driven prominent changes in the marketplace to more sustainable business practices.


Massachusetts 2015 EPP Program

2016 SPLC Leadership Award Winner – Business Case

Organization: Commonwealth of Massachusetts

Contact: Julia Wolfe

Download: Full Case Study PDF

Abstract:

This year marks the 20th anniversary of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts’ Environmentally Preferable Products Procurement Program (EPP Program). The Program’s primary goal is to leverage the Commonwealth’s purchasing power to procure goods and services that have a lesser or reduced negative effect on human health and the environment when compared with competing products or services that serve the same purpose. Since the Program’s inception, thousands of EPPs have been incorporated into more than 40 Statewide Contracts (SWCs) and the state’s purchases of these goods and services have grown from $5 million in 1994 to more than $385 million in Fiscal Year 2015 (FY2015). Massachusetts is one of the few states that supports a dedicated staff person in the procurement program to facilitate environmentally preferable product (EPP) and service purchases. The efforts led by Massachusetts over the last 20 years have helped raise the bar on the quality, cost, and availability of EPPs and also have driven prominent changes in the marketplace to more sustainable business practices.


Solar PV Canopies provide substantial opportunity to rapidly meet state facility installed solar capacity goals

Organization: Commonwealth of Massachusetts

Contact:  Julia Wolfe

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Abstract:

From 2006 – 2014, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts installed just over 8 MW of roof and ground mounted solar PV at State Facilities. In the subsequent three years, following the launch of a solar canopy program by the Department of Energy Resources’ Leading By Example Program (LBE,) more than 9.7 MW of solar canopy capacity was installed, more than doubling total solar arrays at state facilities in less than half the time. Given the Commonwealth’s vast portfolio of large parking lots, Solar PV Canopies provide a substantial opportunity to rapidly meet state installed solar capacity goals with a smaller number of large solar projects. In addition to providing onsite renewable energy generation and reducing energy costs, solar canopies on already developed land also provide ancillary benefits such as reduced heat absorption on parking surfaces (resulting in reduced “heat island” effect), shade and shelter for parked vehicles, cost savings from reduced asphalt maintenance, and a clean electricity source for electric vehicle charging stations that may encourage the adoption of electric vehicles. Additionally, when paired with battery storage, large scale solar canopies can increase the energy resiliency of a site and generate additional savings through reduced peak demand charges.

Because of the success of the program, various additional agencies are now considering the installation of large solar canopies that could add another 10-20 MW of systems at state facilities over the next several years.


Compliance Support and Supplier Engagement

Organization: Compliance Hub

Contact: Douglas Gray

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Abstract:

Sustainable purchasing initiatives that incorporate information on the compliance of their suppliers can be served by cloud-based IT platforms, and in so doing, better manage risk. This case study focuses on processes that supports Sustainable Purchasing initiatives such as provided by the Compliance Hub platform, achieving benefits such as enhanced efficiency of staff; reducing consulting costs; providing affordable training; sharing the costs of supplier engagement; and avoiding mistakes.


Con Edison Sustainable Supply Chain Success

Organization: Con Edison

Contact: Michael Jones-Bey

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Abstract:

In 2017 Supply Chain partnered with Electric Operations to complete a 5-year, $246 million procurement for Distribution Network Equipment. It is anticipated that the sustainability goals will yield a partial “closed loop,” with Con Edison scrap materials being recycled into our manufacturer’s supply chain, thus adding environmental value. In addition, we estimate a total of $16M in savings over 5 years. We have applied MWBE (minority and women owned business) contract goals that will yield opportunities for MWBE firms. Lastly, we have incentivized new suppliers to compete for major items that were previously sole-source.


Copy Paper Impact Reduction Initiative

2015 SPLC Leadership Award Winner – Special Initiative

Organization: County of Alameda

Contact: Karen Cook

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Abstract:

Alameda County has set goals to support paper recycling collection markets; reduce the environmental, social and economic impacts associated with virgin wood fiber use; and address the climate impacts of their day-to-day operations. To achieve these goals, they implemented strategic activities including reducing their use, buying better paper, and leveraging their efforts to advance green purchasing efforts locally. The County has reduced its annual copy paper use from its peak use year in 2009 by 4,000 cases. This reduction, in combination with their significant transition to using primarily 100% post-consumer recycled content paper, has resulted in a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions equivalent to removing 86 passenger cars from the road annually. In 2014, these efforts resulted in a net cost savings of approximately $120,000. By opening the bid to only those businesses currently certified by Alameda County as a Small, Local and Emerging Business, the County is able to provide enhanced contracting opportunities for qualified vendors and promote local business economic opportunities.


Trends in Climate Impacts of Public Agency Procurement: A Meta-Analysis

Organization: County of Alameda

Contact: Karen Cook

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Abstract:

A significant source of emissions associated with an organization are those generated throughout the supply chain as a result of the products and services they consume. These types of indirect purchasing emissions occur as far back as resource extraction within the supply chain and include all emissions through to retail sale of a good or service. A growing number of public organization and higher education institutions are performing inventories to identify and manage these emissions. In order to learn from these findings, and inform other public agencies who lack resources to perform their own inventory, the West Coast Climate and Materials Management Forum convened a research project to perform a meta-analysis of supply chain inventories available in the public domain. Eighty-six inventories from 36 public agencies and higher education institutions were aggregated, summarized and analyzed in order to identify trends in high impact purchasing categories. Significant findings include:

  • Supply chain emissions are larger than other direct and indirect emissions sources typically measured by public agencies and higher education institutions.
  • Construction and Maintenance is the dominant source of supply chain emissions, regardless of organizational type, size, or spend.
  • Across all organization types, Professional Services (as defined by SPLC) contribute approximately 10% of the organizations total supply chain emissions. When community programs are included, the relative contribution doubles for public agencies with populations over 100,000, likely driven by County agencies who fund social safety-net programs (public health and social services) for their communities.

This project was managed by Alameda County with funding support from StopWaste, a public agency responsible for reducing waste in Alameda County, CA.


Green Building Program

Organization: County of Alameda

Contact: Karen Cook

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Abstract:

Alameda County’s greenhouse gas emissions inventory for government operations shows that our buildings are responsible for approximately 40% of our total emissions. Meeting the County’s ambitious climate protection targets requires multiple strategies aimed at ensuring new buildings are designed and constructed to the highest green building standards and meet the County’s specific sustainability requirements. This case study provides an overview of the multi-pronged approach we are taking to reduce the impact of our municipal construction activities to ensure we provide healthy and efficient buildings for our employees and the communities we serve.


Green and Healthy Events

Organization: County of Alameda

Contact: Karen Cook

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Abstract:

Alameda County’s ambitious ten-year Climate Action Plan for Government Services and Operations is, after five years of hard work and collaboration, on track to achieve the 2020 goal of a minimum 15% reduction in operational greenhouse gas emissions. Full implementation will require significant culture shifts in the County, including the purchasing choices of decentralized divisions and employees as they plan the many meetings and events crucial to serving our community. Food and beverage purchasing,
paper and supplies ordering, business travel, and waste generation are all impacted by how events and meetings are conducted. These behaviors are difficult to shift, as decisionmaking about them is decentralized across the entire organization.

To address this challenge, a cross-agency team with input from employee purchasers developed planning resources and a certification checklist that can be applied to a broad range of events and meetings. The resulting Green & Healthy events and meetings program was promoted through an employee engagement campaign that used communitybased social marketing approaches to garner attention and foster behavior change. This innovative program has meaningfully engaged hundreds of event planners and over 18,000 event participants to build a new county culture of sustainable and healthy gatherings.


Green Impact, Locally Grown: Regional Sustainable Procurement Strategies with a Ripple Effect

2019 SPLC Leadership Award Winner – Supplier Engagement

Organization: County of Alameda

Contact: Karen Cook

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Abstract:

Alameda County’s commitment to green purchasing starts with a commitment to a thriving, healthy local environment. Although public procurement is a powerful lever for change in markets, driving regional sustainability forward can be difficult if the County only has influence over its own purchasing dollars. But through local relationships with other public purchasers, one entity can grow the influence and benefit of sustainable procurement strategies, and achieve even greater, more impactful results.

Starting in 2013, the County focused its sustainable procurement leadership on its local community, accelerating green procurement among other local public agency partners through coordinating a Green Purchasing Roundtable, forging collaborative procurements and creating opportunities for piggybacking on pre-negotiated, pre-greened County contracts. The Roundtable, a central feature of the County’s approach, brings together public agencies to share green purchasing strategies and recommendations for products and services that meet a high standard for human and environmental health.

Running a high functioning sustainable purchasing program can be a challenge for public agencies, but by providing technical assistance and facilitating collaboration between public buyers, Alameda County is able to equip jurisdictions with the tools and resources needed to use dollars already in their budget to further sustainability efforts, improve local community health, and expand the scope of impact collaboratively.


Dakota County Environmental Purchasing Initiatives: Making the Right Choices Financially and Environmentally

Organization: Dakota County, MN

Contact: Lenny Klevan Schmitz

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Abstract:

The Dakota County sustainable purchasing program has been developed and grown over the past five years to ensure the organization is making the “right” decisions for taxpayers, both financially and environmentally. The sustainable purchasing program included a variety of initiatives and strategies including:

  1. Incorporate Environmentally Preferred Purchasing language in to the County procurement Policy and obtain County Board approval.
  2. Implement Managed Print Services with follow me printing solution
  3. Work with suppliers to ensure products being purchased by County staff comply with county standards.


Closed Loop Recycled Plastics Initiative

Organization: Dell

Contact: Scott O’Connell

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Abstract:

We’re focused on winning at Dell, but winning the right way. We consider the environment at every stage of the product lifecycle starting with how a product is designed, manufactured, transported, used and ultimately managed at the end of its useful life. We realize that decisions made during product design phase can have lasting impacts. So we use the cradle-to-cradle design methodology, take ownership of products and adopt practices to make each stage of product lifecycle more sustainable. This case study is about one of innovate sustainable initiatives where Dell introduced industry’s first computer made with certified closed loop recycled plastics. As one of the primary IT companies, Dell saw it as an obligation to improve recycling rates for technology products, and with the introduction of closed loop plastics into Dell’s product ecosystem, the company challenged the status quo associated with the lack of plastics recycled in the IT industry. This program resulted in higher collection, recovery and recycling of plastics from IT products. The resin made from closed loop recycled plastics is introduced back into the new parts for Dell’s products. With this vision Dell launched electronic industry’s first computer made with third party-certified closed-loop recycled plastics in May 2014. Today, one year since we announced this initiative, our customers can globally buy several Desktops, Displays and All-in-One’s made with closed loop plastics.


National and State Level Leadership in Sustainability Cohort to pilot the SPLC BENCHMARKS tool

Organization: Department of General Services

Contact: Devika Singh

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Abstract:

Initiating Leadership is a continuous cycle of improvement. The Department of General Services (DGS) serves the state as its business manager. In pursuing our commitment to sustainability and excellence, we sought to measure the maturity of our sustainable purchasing and the programs under its umbrella. The state is able to measure its leadership to other state’s programs by participating in the National Association of State Procurement Officials (NASPO) Cohort to pilot Sustainable Purchasing Leadership Council (SPLC) BENCHMARKSM tool. A second Cohort was released to ask California state departments to measure the maturity of internal procurement operations. Comparing sustainable public procurement (SPP) strengthens SPP globally, creating a shared understanding of the possibilities and opportunities for improvement, thus establishing a framework for specific actions: With the above mentioned guiding principles in mind, DGS sponsored California Cohort to pilot SPLC BENCHMARKSM tool last year. A philosophy that emphasizes inclusion, planning, and clear thinking derived from SPLC guidance. The approach is both analytical and pragmatic, and features the goals, strategies, and results listed below.


Responsiveness: How One Buyer is Using Renewable Energy to Meet Multiple Objectives

Organization: Digital Realty Trust

Contact: Aaron Binkley

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Abstract:

Digital Realty-a real estate investment trust that manages 144 data center properties across 36 global markets, in addition to a robust colocation services business–has taken unique action on sourcing and purchasing renewable energy in order to meet the needs of its customers, while simultaneously pursuing financial goals to save money on energy costs by buying renewables.

To date, Digital Realty has purchased more than 400,000 MWh of renewable energy certificates (RECs) to provide carbon-free computing to its Digital Realty-hosted data center clients, and has executed an 88 MW nameplate capacity power purchase agreement (PPAs) to offer the same to its co-located leasees. The company has set a goal of 100% renewables across its global portfolio and has addressed 22% of its real estate with green power to date, for a forecasted annual reduction of more than 275,000 tons of CO2e.


USAG Fort Lee Hazardous Material Management Program: Enterprise Environmental, Safety and Occupational Health- Management Information System Integration

Organization: Directorate of Public Works Environmental Management Division

Contact: Carol A. Anderson

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Abstract:

In 2014, United States Army leaders distributed an order for the integration of a standardized hazardous material tracking platform. The selected inventory tracking system for use at all US Army Installations was the Enterprise Environmental, Safety and Occupational Health-Management Information System (EESOH-MIS). Long-term objectives include analysis of the procurement process of hazardous materials, the reduction and prevention of hazardous waste, increased accountability of materials on site, and a shift toward the procurement of sustainable products.

Full operation of EESOH-MIS took years of planning and collaboration between multiple departments and divisions, the development of an official policy and plan, and included many instances of trial and error. This incorporation was implemented in phases which included data collection, detailed inspections at each facility, product information upload, EESOH-MIS training for end users, and the development of Authorized Use Lists (AUL) for each individual shop. Currently, USAG Fort Lee is the first Army installation to have a fully functional EESOH-MIS platform within our HMMP.


Sustainable Purchasing Program

2016 SPLC Leadership Award Winner – Purchaser – Overall Program

Organization: District of Columbia

Contact: Jonathan Rifkin

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Abstract:

The District of Columbia Sustainable Purchasing program was built on the premise that sustainable considerations can be embraced across our institution if:

1) Sustainable specifications are designed in a way that balances sustainability with the basic needs of a procurement stakeholder, e.g. cost, availability, and performance.
2) The process of embedding guidance language into specifications is made as simple as possible via employee support and “cut and paste” templates, and
3) Training resources and tracking tools are embedded in the District’s standard operating procedures, thus institutionalizing efforts and raising the awareness of initiatives their inevitability in the eyes of the rank and file.

With the above mentioned guiding premises in mind, the DC Sustainable Purchasing Program was launched last year. A philosophy that emphasizes inclusion, planning, and clear thinking resulted in methodologies and tools, often reflected in, and sometimes derived from, SPLC guidance. The DC approach is both analytical and pragmatic, and features the goals, strategies, and results listed below. Efforts to prioritize and plan for procurements, promote use of DC sustainable guidance, train relevant stakeholders, and track progress using OCP’s e-procurement system are all outlined the case study below.
The success of the award-winning program could only be realized with the support of agency and organizational management. Therefore, credit must be given to the District’s leadership for providing resources and time to the SPP.


DC Efforts to Institutionalize Sustainable Purchasing

Organization: District of Columbia

Contact: Jonathan Rifkin

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Abstract:

When the District of Columbia set out to establish its Sustainable Purchasing Program, the over-arching goal was to institutionalize sustainable considerations throughout all phases of the procurement process. This study explains the strategies that the District is utilizing, the tactics used to pursue successful completion of each strategy, and a brief commentary that outlines the lessons learned from each endeavor. All actions taken in development of the new SPP were predicated upon three basic principles: 1) The process should be as inclusive as possible, 2) Resources and tools should mimic existing templates and standard operating procedures so as to limit the impact of the program on operations, and 3) The effort must be sufficiently resourced so that proper support is offered to District employees following the launch of the program.


The Paper Trail: Digitizing Transparency

Organization: Domtar Corporation

Contact: Daniel Persica

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Abstract:

In 2011, Domtar revolutionized the pulp and paper industry by releasing The Paper Trail, a transparency tool that allowed users to learn the estimated environmental impacts of select paper products. By 2015, the company unveiled an entirely new version of the site – one that allowed customers to view not only gate-to-gate environmental impacts associated with their purchases, but also the social and economic impacts of buying responsibly crafted North American paper. All the while, the tool continued to maintain the transparency that made it unique, disclosing not only what Domtar was doing well, but also those areas it was looking to improve upon! Since The Paper Trail’s re-launch in early 2015, the site has seen a 300 percent increase in both visits and time spent on the tool, indicating a true interest from customers and the general public in learning more about the origins of the products they buy every day.


Sustainable Supply Chain Tool

Organization: EarthCheck and Banyan Tree Hotels & Resorts

Contact: Andre Russ

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Abstract:

Banyan Tree Holdings is a leading developer, designer, and operator of premium resorts, hotels, spas and galleries. EarthCheck is a leading scientific benchmarking, certification, and advisory group for travel and tourism, delivering responsible business practices, driving efficiency gains, and safe guarding the natural and social environment. In 2015, the two groups joined forces to create a sustainable supply chain solution and tool that was process efficient, scalable, not cost prohibitive, and had in-built functionality for third party certification. This case study describes the steps taken and the results achieved.


Innovating Toward Sustainability One Custodial Shift at a Time

Organization: Ecolab

Contact: Lynne Olson

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Abstract:

Large facilities such as airports are looking to achieve resource reduction and cost savings throughout their operations. The Clark County Department of Aviation installed electrolyzed water on-site generation system for use in the daily custodial operations at Las Vegas’ McCarran International Airport to achieve resource and cost reductions and improve cleanliness. This system combines the basic inputs of water, electricity and natural minerals with patented electrolytic cell technology to produce affordable and sustainable daily cleaning, sanitizing and disinfecting solutions for use on the varied surfaces commonly found in large public and commercial facilities. The on-site generation solution is powerful enough to perform as a hospital-grade disinfectant, while still being safe enough that no personal protective equipment is required during the dilution and cleaning process. Download Ecolab Supplemental Materials


Leveraging Data to Simplify and Streamline Sustainable Procurement

Organization: Ecomedes

Contact: Paul Shahriari

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Abstract:

The Ecomedes platform consolidated product performance data from three Federal programs and three third-party ecolabels/standards. The result is a product performance database from over 300,000 products, representing 5700 brands, including over 4 million ecodata points. This data was mapped to the Green Procurement Compilation (GPC) requirements with some simple ROI impact calculators for energy and water savings. Energy reduction in kWh and water reduction in gallons, realized by the deployment of pre-vetted, high-performance products was converted into operational cost savings.

This platform reduces the typical multiple-hour procurement process to less than 15 minutes. Institutional buyers utilizing this platform can reduce overhead costs of procurement research and documentation by over 95%. When added to the energy, water, and maintenance savings generated by deploying higher performing products, the organizational ROI will significantly increase.


Energizing Sustainability in ENOC

2019 SPLC Leadership Award Winner – Business Case

Organization: Emirates National Oil Company

Contact: Alia Busamra, Manager - Group Sustainability | Saravanan Dhalavoi, Sr. Sustainability Specialist | Hamid Al Haddad, Green Procurement Officer

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Abstract:

Emirates National Oil Company Limited (ENOC) L.L.C. is a leading integrated global oil and gas player operating across the energy sector value chain. A wholly owned company of the Government of Dubai, ENOC was initially established in 1993.

In ENOC, we see Sustainability not as a compliance driven initiative rather as a cultural change within ENOC to ensure long-term viability of providing cleaner fuel for our customers. This started with the creation of Group Sustainability Office (GSO) within ENOC when all issues related to sustainability performance were aligned with the GSO mandate. Issues like Energy, Environment, and Social responsibility were moved under the GSO to create the right synergy in managing sustainability performance of ENOC. ENOC takes its commitment to green procurement principles seriously and in 2016 ENOC set up a team for Green Procurement Practices to support Green Public Procurement (GPP). ENOC was a pioneer in creating the “Green Procurement Officer” position within ENOC to advise ENOC business units and departments on green purchasing and act as a gate keeper for such purchases. To ingrain the culture of improving sustainability performance within ENOC, all the corporate functions and Business Units (BUs) were mandated to improve on the ENOC’s Group Sustainability Index (made of 19 specific KPIs) which is a new KPI introduced in the Score Card in 2017. Also in 2017, new Sustainability Committees were formed, and in particular the Sustainability Leadership Committee (SLC) led by the Group CEO has the mandate to advise and assist the ENOC Board and provide guidance to improve ENOC’s sustainability performance.


Sustainable Food Initiative

Organization: Emory University

Contact: Ciannat Howell

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Abstract:

Increasing sustainability of its food supply chain is one of the key priorities of Emory University. This case study focuses on three aspects of this project: improving sustainable food procurement, evaluating the use of compostable and recyclable products, and eliminating the use of Styrofoam.


EPA’s Recommendations of Specification, Standards, and Ecolabels for Federal Purchasing

Organization: Environmental Protection Agency

Contact: Jenna Larkin

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Abstract:

For 25 years, EPA’s Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Program has been at the forefront of identifying environmental and human health performance strategies for key sectors and helping transform the market through the power of federal purchasing. After years of stakeholder engagement and a much anticipated pilot effort, in December 2016 the EPP Program released Recommendations of Specifications, Standards, and Ecolabels in order to help federal purchasers meet sustainable purchasing goals. A sustainability “game changer,” the Recommendations leverage and increase market confidence in private sector initiatives that have demonstrated positive, measurable, and meaningful change in the environmental performance of products and services – from electronics to building materials to janitorial products and more.


A Leader in Driving Towards a Robust and Sustainable Electric Utility Industry Supply Chain

Organization: EUISSCA

Contact: Chris Peterson

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Abstract:

The Electric Utility Industry Sustainable Supply Chain Alliance (The Alliance) has become the leader for driving supply chain sustainability in the utility industry. It brings together members from a diverse group of companies and suppliers in activities to drive sustainability improvements up the supply chain.

The Alliance is pursuing a series of goals in support of its vision to lead the industry towards a robust and sustainable supply chain. Through a combination of member commitment, effort, structure and strategies, the Alliance is on track to reach these goals. Examples of our successes include: the maturation of members; development of 5 voluntary standards; doubling the attendance at our annual event between 2014 and 2015; multiple speaking engagements on the value of supply chain sustainability; and an active and contributing member base.


Leveraging Joint Action to Scale Change at an Industry Level through Purchasing

Organization: Fair Trade USA

Contact: Parker Townley

Download: Full Case Study PDF

Abstract:

The Sustainable Coffee Challenge launched in 2015 with the goal of transforming the coffee industry into the world’s first 100% sustainable agricultural commodity. In the time since the commitment has launched, a range of organizations have made public announcements stating their individual commitments to increase transparency and align around a common vision for sustainability with regards to coffee procurement. Fair Trade USA has worked to leverage its unique position as an industry convener to bring together a range of actors representing various levels of the supply chain to harness their collective purchasing power and networks to launch a joint commitment to dramatically scale impact. By developing clear options and mechanisms for making facilitated commitments to purchasing sustainable coffee Fair Trade USA was able to bring together a diverse set of organizations who could collectively support each other through the process, and in doing so leverage and strengthen an existing sustainable sourcing model. The launch of a joint commitment in March 2019 serves as a starting point and a powerful incentive mechanism to encourage additional actors to make the internal case for action and commit to meaningful impact.


Federal Office Furniture Buying Guide

Organization: Federal Furniture Mult-Agency Commodity Team

Contact: Linda Valdes

Download: Full Case Study PDF

Abstract:

A federal multi-agency cross functional commodity team was established in 2012 with the goal of reducing the environmental, social and economic (ESE) costs associated with office furniture purchases through strategic sourcing. The result is the 2015 Office Furniture Ordering Guide. The strategic sourcing approach employed by the multi-agency team resulted in fewer overall office purchases, improved ability to incorporate sustainability into purchase requests as a result of product standardization and configuration, and improved capacity to make trade-offs between technical considerations (including sustainability features) and price. In addition, the Ordering Guide requires that all office furniture products conform to either BIFMA level®, SCS Indoor Advantage™ or GREENGUARD. Notably, the Ordering Guide distinguishes itself from other federal contract vehicles by requiring that all products meet a level of sustainable performance, something no other comparable federal contract vehicle has achieved. A limitation of the Ordering Guide is that it is not a contract vehicle. This means that purchases of furniture meeting the guide cannot be tracked through the Federal Procurement Data System and that detailed spend data is unavailable. Another limitation is that agencies have not been required to date to commit, in writing or financially, to using the Ordering Guide.


Leveraging a Shared Services Model to Impact Sustainability

Organization: FedEx

Contact: Cade Clanton

Download: Full Case Study PDF

Abstract:

Since September of 2013, the FedEx Sourcing Organization has been operating as a centralized, shared services sourcing and procurement group. This effort brought together the previously de-centralized sourcing organizations that were housed inside FedEx Ground, FedEx Express, and FedEx Freight. A vital step in this process was to create the Supplier Relationship Management team with a focus in five key areas: sustainability, diversity, risk, category management, and supplier evaluations. The focus on sustainability that this team has brought to the table is evident in how sustainability criteria has now been woven into the four major focus areas that the Sourcing Organization has: category strategies, strategic four step sourcing methodology, scorecards and evaluations, and quarterly business reviews. By continuing to leverage the relationships that are formed with our business teams and our suppliers, we will continue to be able to excel in the above mentioned areas as well as discover opportunities and develop solutions across a much broader spectrum as we continue on our journey.


Developing a Closed Loop Recycling System for Small Plastic Sort Bags

Organization: FedEx

Contact: Cade Clanton

Download: Full Case Study PDF

Abstract:

The goal of the project was to work with one of our suppliers to develop a closed loop system for proper recycling of the plastic parcel sort bags that are used at FedEx Ground facilities throughout the network. This resulted in an elimination of over 14.4 million pounds of landfill waste and rebates of over $2.6M over 10 years. The rebates are attributed to FedEx supplying used bags back to Petoskey in order to be recycled and remanufactured into new bags.


Diesel Exhaust Fluid (DEF) Waste Reduction

Organization: FedEx

Contact: Cade Clanton

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Abstract:

FedEx Express has nearly 15,000 vehicles that require diesel exhaust fluid (DEF). It was determined that nearly 99% of the DEF was purchased in 2.5 gallon plastic containers that were shipped two per cardboard box, 40 boxes per pallet. The goal of the project was to eliminate the use of 2.5 gallon plastic containers entirely. The strategy included a phased approach to equipping each FedEx Express location with permanent bulk (55 gallons or more) DEF storage containers and delivery equipment. This not only reduced landfill waste but also provided significant cost savings due to lower bulk pricing. The project has resulted in over 2.3 million pounds of waste being diverted from landfills and an overall cost savings of $2.4 million annually.


The Baddour Center

Organization: FedEx

Contact: Cade Clanton

Download: Full Case Study PDF

Abstract:

The Baddour Center is a residential community for adults with mild to moderate intellectual disabilities. Founded in December of 1978, The Baddour Center has grown from its initial five residents to its present capacity of 170 residents, representing individuals of various ages, races, regions, and socioeconomic statuses. By working with organizations such as The Baddour Center, FedEx can reach its goal of working with diverse and small businesses. The programs with Baddour support the local community in a unique way and provides a sense of accomplishment for its residents. FedEx spends about $3 million annually with The Baddour Center.


Diesel to Electric – FedEx Ground Support Equipment

Organization: FedEx

Contact: Cade Clanton

Download: Full Case Study PDF

Abstract:

FedEx has been instrumental in influencing its suppliers to provide products and services that create a positive impact in the FedEx supply chain and the environment. This is the case of one FedEx Remanufacturing Suppliers. For 25 years FedEx has refurbished specific Ground Support Equipment, this action aides in cost savings for the company and allows remanufacturing of materials that would have otherwise taken years to disintegrate in the landfills. FedEx and its remanufacturing supplier have also taken additional initiatives to improve environmental sustainability such as ordering a conversion of a diesel engine equipment into an electric vehicle.


ReUsable Core Stretchfilm

Organization: FedEx

Contact: Maya Hayes

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Abstract:

In an effort to reduce FedEx’s environmental impact, FedEx’s Corporate Social Responsibility and Strategic Sourcing worked together to implement a reusable core stretch film for FedEx’s SmartPost operations. This product diminished the amount of paperboard and plastic waste in landfills and reduced product cost.


FedEx Express Pickup and Delivery Fleet Electrification

Organization: FedEx Corporate Services, Inc.

Contact: Kyle Mitchell

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Abstract:

FedEx continually seeks new ways to maximize fuel efficiency, minimize environmental impacts and find innovative solutions through the company’s Reduce, Replace, and Revolutionize approach to sustainability. In an effort to serve our customers and connect the world responsibly, FedEx Express is set to add 1,000 Zero Emission Electric Vehicles to the Pickup and Delivery Fleet in California. These 1,000 Zero Emission Vehicles will be replacing 1,000 existing Diesel powered vehicles in California. Once operational, these EVs can travel more than 150 miles on a single charge and has the potential to save 2,000 gallons of Diesel while avoiding 20 tons of emissions per vehicle per year. Electric Vehicles (EVs) present an attractive case for lower emissions and Total Cost of Ownership for densely-populated urban last mile pick-up and delivery (PUD) applications. This project catalyzes FXE’s goal to increase vehicle fuel efficiency 50% from a 2005 baseline by 2025, and is the initial step for an upcoming large scale EV deployments across the US.


Ford’s Partnership for A Cleaner Environment (PACE) Program

Organization: Ford Motor Company

Contact: Mary Wroten

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Abstract:

Ford Motor Company is committed to reducing the environmental footprint of our vehicles, our operations and our supply chain. For our own operations, we have a commitment and a strategy to reduce energy consumption, water use and carbon dioxide emissions and we are working to promote a similar commitment throughout the automotive supply chain. Ford’s Partnership for A Cleaner Environment, or PACE program, aims to help our suppliers minimize their impact on the environment. Through PACE, we will share details of our leading practices for water, energy and carbon dioxide emissions reductions with suppliers. In return, suppliers are asked to share their environmental data and their best practices with Ford annually. We began testing the PACE program in 2014, and have expanded the program in 2015 to include a total of 25 strategic production suppliers representing 800 manufacturing sites in 41 countries.


Labor and Human Rights

Organization: Green Electronics Council

Contact: Jonathan Rifkin

Download: Full Case Study PDF

Abstract:

Institutional purchasers, in both the public and private sector, are increasingly interested in procuring products which are not only environmentally preferable but have also been produced in a socially responsible manner. Knowing what to ask suppliers regarding how they are addressing negative labor and human rights impacts and what constitutes credible supporting documentation from a supplier is a challenge for both public and private sector purchasers. To address this challenge, GEC has created a guide which provides institutional purchasers with guidance to assist them in procuring IT products from companies that are improving the social responsibility of their supply chains.

The guidance includes questions that purchasers can ask in solicitations, and supporting documentation that purchasers can use throughout the procurement process to:

  • Better understand the IT sector’s capacity to address labor and human rights impacts.
  • Introduce labor and human rights related performance criteria in technical specifications, supplier selection and procurement award criteria, as well as in contract performance clauses.
  • When monitoring and evaluating the results of procurements, provide purchasers with supplier labor and human rights performance data to confirm that purchasers are meeting their internal responsible sourcing and sustainable procurement goals.
  • Assist purchasers in assuring that labor and human rights regulatory requirements are met.

GEC Guide on Sustainable Cloud Computing Helps Purchasers Realize and Capture Sustainability Gains

Organization: Green Electronics Council

Contact: Jonathan Rifkin

Download: Full Case Study PDF

Abstract:

Purchasers are increasingly buying cloud services to meet their software and computing needs, including Software as a Service (SaaS), data storage, and big data analytics. Purchasers procure cloud services in anticipation for improvements in efficiency, scalability, and cost effectiveness, while not necessarily understanding the impact on their organization’s sustainability performance. The challenge for purchasers is identifying the potential sustainability gains associated with migration to the cloud and the relevant information to ask of suppliers to help them claim those sustainability benefits. GEC developed the “Purchaser Guide on Sustainability and Cloud Service Procurements” to address this challenge, and to help institutional purchasers identify sustainability gains associated with their procurement of cloud services by posing questions to Cloud Service Providers regarding their performance in several relevant areas.

The guide is designed to help purchasers accomplish the following three goals:

1) Understand where sustainability gains are possible in the provision of cloud services;

2) Improve the dialogue with cloud services providers on their current and planned sustainability improvements;

3) Facilitate collection of supplier data that can be translated into organizational sustainability benefits associated with the decision to procure cloud services.


The GEC Environmental Benefits Calculator enhances purchaser ability to quantify the benefits of purchasing EPEAT products

Organization: Green Electronics Council

Contact: Jonathan Rifkin

Download: Full Case Study PDF

Abstract:

The Green Electronics Council (GEC) developed a next-generation environmental benefits calculator for EPEAT product categories including mobile phones, servers, and computers and displays. The web-based calculator features an easy-to-use interface and outputs that help purchasers quantify and understand the lifecycle benefits associated with using EPEAT-rated products. The ability to measure the benefits of sustainable IT products is highly valued by institutional purchasers, who increasingly must report and defend the environmental consequences of their procurement decisions. The GEC calculator focuses on metrics important to purchasers and their internal and external stakeholders, including greenhouse gas, energy, solid waste, and cost reduction. The calculator places a premium on producing credible calculations, and on adding value to the purchaser experience.


Benefits of Multi-Attribute Sustainable Product Certification

Organization: GreenCircle Certified, LLC

Contact: Annie Bevan

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Abstract:

As some of the largest purchasers of goods and services, federal agencies have long been at the forefront of sustainable procurement. Responding to mandates, executive orders, and internal goals, agencies such as the Department of Defense (DoD) and many others have collectively been looking for a method to simplify the sustainable procurement process for federal purchasers and consumers alike. While other federal agencies are developing specific product category standards, the recent Federal Executive Order 13693, Planning for Federal Sustainability in the Next Decade, requires sustainable purchasing regardless of whether a product category standard has been established. Tasked with meeting sustainable procurement mandates in the short term, while also working to meet long-term objectives, these federal agencies are turning to third-party certifications. Following continued complaints of greenwashing and misleading claims, these agencies see third-party certification as the catalyst for ensuring accuracy and transparency in federal procurement. Through a combined effort by the OSD, NDCEE (CTC), and GreenCircle, a Multi-Attribute Label Pilot Program has been developed. Using GreenCircle’s Certified Environmental Facts label, the pilot program helps validate accuracy in sustainability claims, provides manufacturers a benchmark of their products and operations, and demonstrates the functionality of sustainable products against their standard counterparts. Having received overwhelmingly positive survey responses from DoD procurement agents regarding the label format and sustainable purchasing, the DoD and GreenCircle are currently seeking manufacturers to participate in the Pilot Program which is being used to connect sustainable product manufacturers with federal purchasers, aiding in meeting federal procurement requirements.


Avoiding Chemical Flame Retardants

Organization: Harvard University

Contact: William Shanker

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Abstract:

Harvard University’s Sustainability Plan, created with faculty, students, and staff, makes a specific commitment to identifying and reducing chemicals of concern on campus, both to eliminate risks to our vulnerable populations and to enhance the health and well-being of our community. University-wide Green Building Standards include healthy material requirements for the disclosure of the health and environmental impact of products that are used on campus, and additional research is being conducted with Harvard researchers.

In November 2015, Harvard became the first university to sign a national pledge stating a preference for purchasing flame retardant-free furniture. Other signatories to the pledge include Kaiser Permanente, Facebook, Blue Cross Blue Shield Massachusetts, and Autodesk. The Office for Sustainability partnered with Harvard capital project and planning teams, Strategic Procurement, and Environmental Health and Safety to identify and source chemical flame retardant-free furniture across the University, and in accordance with regulations.


University Procurement Mobilizing for Ethical Labor Standards

Organization: Harvard University

Contact: Diana Sheedy

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Abstract:

Universities are the center of thought leadership, training global leaders and citizens of the world. Their business practices should reflect the same core values. Expanding on the anti-sweatshop movement that reformed licensed goods, our work is focused on uniting universities in their ethical labor standards through vendor codes of conduct and procurement standards. Sustainability needs to promote the social dimension for our global economy, and universities are positioned to leverage their shared vendors to promote businesses that are transparent and treat all workers in their supply chains with respect: meeting high human rights standards.

More specifically, students are partnering with faculty and world experts to 1) create ethical procurement standards for universities, and 2) innovate business models that can incorporate human rights without harming their business success. Since March of 2016, leading universities are contributing in their unique roles as administrators, students, professors, sustainability directors, finance officers, human rights experts and more. The first policy implementation is aimed for the fall of 2018, but we are looking for every school to unite in order to make this a truly powerful movement across universities as we leverage cutting research, technology, and procurement management systems to ensure policies are put into practice.


Kicking Flame Retardant Chemicals Out of Office Furniture

Organization: HDR

Contact: Judy Levin

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Abstract:

The Center for Environmental Health partnered with HDR’s Architecture company and Jean Hansen, Senior Professional Associate, Sustainable Interiors Manager, and five other large purchasers to find ways to reduce the use of toxic and untested flame retardant chemicals in office furniture nationwide. Through the development of a six-person “Purchaser Strategy Advisory Group,” a strategy for success was developed including the use of purchaser training, a “Purchaser Pledge to Prefer Flame Retardant-Free Furniture,” the provision of ready-to-go purchasing tools and technical assistance.


Sustainable Marketing Execution

Organization: HH Global

Contact: Avleen Kaur Kohli

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Abstract:

HH Global, the leading provider of marketing execution to the world’s biggest brands, has taken the initiative to help reduce the environmental impact of marketing.

Every day, major brands promote their products and services through printed collaterals. Even with the growth of digital channels, thousands of metric tons of paper are used in this process.

Our “Innovation with Purpose” strategy targets to save 32,000 trees within one year by helping our clients make sustainable purchasing choices for all types of paper, work with suppliers to source sustainable alternatives, quantifying impact through lifecycle assessments, and aligning our efforts with the UN Sustainable Development Goals – the global plan to make a better world by 2030.

In partnership with leading consultants and NGOs, we developed a calculator to measure the amount of trees, energy, water, and CO2 involved in the production of printed collateral and Point of Sale (PoS) displays we purchase for our clients. These results are shared with our clients through simple and engaging dashboards to help them understand the effect their purchasing choices have on our planet and how their choices can make a difference.

We then offer innovative solutions to reduce this impact. Both environmental and financial savings are tracked and shared with our clients using clear and appealing graphics.


Organic Waste Diversion

Organization: Hilton

Contact: Judy Pines

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Abstract:

New York City (NYC) generates 1.8 million tons of commercial and residential organic waste per year. In 2012 then Mayor Michael Bloomberg committed to doubling the amount of waste the city recycles or composts. In July 2015 the NYC Commercial Organic Waste law went into effect mandating specific large scale generators to arrange for the recycling of their organic waste.


Sustainable Landscaping Solution

Organization: Hilton

Contact: Judy Pines

Download: Full Case Study PDF

Abstract:

Water is a finite resource that is critical to basic human survival. Studies show that demand is projected to exceed supply by 40 percent by 2030.

As a large consumer of water, Hilton is committed to implementing water conservation measures and driving efficiencies around water use in order to protect the environment, meet both operational and guest needs, as well as support the communities in which our hotels operate.

According to the EPA, the hospitality sector is responsible for 19% of water usage, and landscaping, the second largest use of water in hotels, accounts for 16% of a property’s budget. As part of Hilton’s commitment to reduce water consumption, we implemented a sustainable landscaping solution. In partnership with Southwest Greens, the turf division of Shaw Industries Group, a Berkshire Hathaway Company, Hilton developed and implemented a Synthetic Turf Program in late 2015, for our portfolio of 14 global brands.


Hilton Corporate Wide Mattress Recycling Program Diverts 1,000,000+ Pounds of Waste

Organization: Hilton Supply Management

Contact: Judy Pines

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Abstract:

One of the biggest challenges for hotels trying to reduce waste is the disposal of mattresses and box springs. According to the Mattress Recycling Council, more than 50,000 mattresses end up in landfills each day. But what happens to all of those mattresses at the end of their useful life when it’s time for the hotel to upgrade them?

In support of Hilton’s commitment to reduce waste generated by our properties, we recognized the need to provide our hotels with a sustainable option for the disposal of their used bed sets and developed a corporate wide Mattress Recycling Program.

In 2017, the Hilton Anaheim, located in Anaheim, CA and one of Hilton’s highest occupancy hotels with 1574 guest rooms, replaced their old mattresses with new ones. In order to be compliant with CA Law SB 254, which mandates that all mattresses and box springs discarded in the state be recycled, a strategic plan was developed to remove and replace 2,589 used mattresses, replace them with new ones, and simultaneously, minimize disruption to hotel operations and hotel guests. This mattress recycling initiative resulted in the diversion of 306,894 pounds of solid waste.


Bringing Sustainability Full Circle: HP’s Circular Economy Journey

Organization: HP

Contact: Shelley Zimmer

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Abstract:

Since the beginning of the industrial age, the traditional development and manufacturing model has taken a linear “take, make, dispose” approach—one in which businesses create a product that is somehow disposed of by the consumer when it’s no longer needed. While this model satisfies the immediate needs of buyers, it is highly wasteful, as many products soon end up in landfills.

HP recognizes that the old model is no longer sustainable and has changed the way it designs, manufactures, services, recycles, and reuses its products. Building on a legacy of sustainable design, HP has moved to the more sustainable “make, use, return” model of a circular economy.

This case study examines some of the circular economy solutions HP has developed and how HP is helping customers reduce costs, improve efficiencies, and lower their environmental impact.


Closing the Loop with Ocean-Bound Plastics from Haiti

Organization: HP Inc.

Contact: Ellen Jackowski

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Abstract:

In Haiti, a country ravaged by poverty and struggling to recover from the devastating 2010 earthquake, bottled water is its citizens’ lifeline to clean drinking water. Because Haiti does not have proper bottle disposal methods, bottles litter the land, canals, and shoreline—oftentimes finding their way into the Caribbean Sea.

Working with the First Mile Coalition and its recycling suppliers, HP created a program to collect plastic bottles from Haiti to be used in its closed-loop recycling program to manufacture new Original HP ink cartridges.

Through this program, HP reinvented its supply chain procurement approach to consider the “social impact” of how and where it sources materials.

In addition, through this initiative, HP is helping:

• Create new jobs and microbusinesses;

• Improve working conditions for Haitians collecting recyclable materials;

• Provide educational and healthcare opportunities for the children of Haiti;

• Clean the environment of the poorest country in the Western Hemisphere;

• Address the growing problem of ocean-bound plastics.

By adding “social impact” to its purchasing strategy—without increasing costs or compromising the quality of its product or supply chain standards—HP is accelerating its vision of “making life better for everyone, everywhere.”


Increasing Participation of Micro & Small Enterprises in Public Procurement

Organization: Indian Railways

Contact: Sanjay Kumar

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Abstract:

Micro and Small Enterprises (MSEs), by virtue of their contributions (7% of the manufacturing GDP and 31% of the service GDP) to the national economy, are considered the backbone of the Indian economy. Due to the fact that about 55.0% of the MSEs are based out of rural areas, these enterprises have proved to be pivotal in promoting sustainable and inclusive development as well as generating large-scale employment.

The Government of India issued an executive order in 2012 regarding increasing the share of MSEs in procurement by all ministries and central public sector undertakings from the present level to 20% by year 2015-16. In compliance of this order, Indian Railways undertook several measures to increase access of MSEs to public tenders and enhance their share in procurement by setting up indicators and tweaking its e-procurement system for monitoring procurement from MSEs. This resulted in an increased share of MSEs in procurement from about 12% in 2012 to about 25% in 2016. This in turn has indirectly benefitted society, created employments in rural areas and contributed to sustainable economic development.


Forwarding More Responsible Mining

2016 SPLC Leadership Award Winner – Public Interest Advocate

Organization: Initiative for Responsible Mining Assurance

Contact: Aimee Boulanger

Download: Full Case Study PDF

Abstract:

Mining is a complex and intensive process that causes environmental and social change no matter where it occurs. IRMA’s vision is that of a world in which the mining industry respects human rights and the aspirations of affected communities; provides safe, healthy and respectful workplaces; avoids or minimizes harm to the environment; and leaves positive legacies. To this end, IRMA’s mission is to establish a multi-stakeholder and independently verified responsible mining program that certifies leaders, and also measures continuing improvement, in social and environmental performance. Founded in 2006 by a coalition of nongovernment organizations, businesses purchasing minerals and metals for resale in other products, affected communities, mining companies, and trade unions, IRMA is developing standards for environmental and social issues related to mining, including labor rights, human rights, indigenous peoples and cultural heritage, conflict response, pollution control and site closure. IRMA is planning a “pilot phase” for the first certifications in 2017.


Lowering risks for purchasing mined materials

Organization: Initiative for Responsible Mining Assurance

Contact: Aimee Boulanger

Download: Full Case Study PDF

Abstract:

The Initiative for Responsible Mining Assurance (IRMA) has formally launched this year after a decade of consultation with stakeholders that led to the comprehensive, internationally recognized Standard for Responsible Mining, a globally focused standard on what best practice in responsible mining looks like for industrial scale mines in any part of the world, in any size industrial mine, and for all mined materials (except for energy fuels). We are working to foster responsibility at a broad scale through fundamentally shifting value for more responsible mining globally through encouraging purchasers to engage with their suppliers. Such a shift will allow companies that purchase products using mined materials to create strong support for the communities, landscapes, workers, and ecosystems in mining countries. Through engaging stakeholders at all levels of the value chain, we believe such a shift is within reach.


Connecting Environmentally and Socially Responsible Businesses Around the World

Organization: Intengine Enterprises, Inc.

Contact: Connie Linder

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Abstract:

With the leadership of our Founder and CEO Connie Linder, Intengine Enterprises has evolved into the world’s most comprehensive and relevant database of responsible businesses for sustainable supply chain – growing at a rate of 25 percent per month. Intengine’s role is to help bridge the gap between shared environmental objectives and the means and knowledge required to achieve their fulfillment.


Supplier Selection and Engagement for Developing Innovative and More Sustainable Products: An Interface Case Study on Luxury Vinyl Flooring

Organization: Interface

Contact: Kathy McDuffie

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Abstract:

Interface pioneered sustainable manufacturing in the flooring industry and became the world’s largest commercial modular carpet manufacturer. The company made the decision to enter resilient flooring because of the tremendous market opportunity and customer demand. Interface saw an opportunity to not only bring to market a more sustainable LVT product, but help transform the category to become more sustainable. The company began to search and engage a luxury vinyl tile manufacturing partner that could create a product that not only aligned with Interface’s sustainability and recycling goals, but also met the company’s demanding performance and installation requirements. After a thorough global RFP process and site visits, the company chose the right manufacturer partner who worked together with Interface to design and manufacture a high-performing and beautiful product that met specific customer needs and sustainability performance requirements.


Achieving Mission Zero through Supply Chain Collaboration

Organization: Interface, Inc.

Contact: Tad Radzinski

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Abstract:

Interface first challenged industry in the 90s by adopting a never-before-seen commitment to have zero negative impact on the environment by 2020, later known as “Mission Zero.” In 2016, Interface again challenged the status quo by committing to showing industry how to run a company in a way that helps reverse global warming, a new mission and movement known as Climate Take Back. Through their Climate Take Back and Mission Zero 2020 commitments, Interface aims to change the expectations of business sustainability from reducing harm to solving the world’s greatest challenges, starting with climate change. Their Mission Zero promise include publicly disclosing their progress towards these 2020 goals through GreenCircle’s Certified Environmental Facts Label as well as engaging suppliers to look into material ingredients and disclose information. Such initiatives demonstrate Interface’s commitments to optimizing their products as well as the impacts associated with their manufacturing facilities.

Mission Zero promises to eliminate any and all negative impact that Interface has on the environment by the year 2020, through protection, restoration, innovation, and education. The seven key focus areas include:

  • Zero waste
  • Benign emissions
  • Renewable energy
  • Closing the loop
  • Resource-efficient transportation
  • Sensitivity hookup
  • Redesign commerce

Mission Zero seeks to understand the natural world, as well as how everything we do, take, make and waste affects nature’s balance. With this understanding, Interface has built processes and policies that:

  • Sustain the environment by taking nothing from the earth cannot easily and rapidly be replaced.
  • Sustain society by educating employees and associates on environmental impact and creating solutions that reduce this footprint.
  • Sustain economic health by creating products and solutions that are not only environmentally-friendly, but profitable as well.

Climate Take Back introduces four new pillars in order to shift impacts from negative to positive: “Live Zero,” “Love Carbon,” “Let Nature Cool,” and “Lead the Industrial Re-Revolution.” These narratives flip the script and encourage all organizations to revolutionize the way we think about climate change. Climate Take Back includes goals for zero impact, utilizing carbon as a resource, support the biosphere, and utilize industry to change manufacturing.


Utilization of Biomethane to Reduce Carbon Emissions: A Case Study with Interface

Organization: Interface, Inc. & Element Markets

Contact: Kathy McDuffie

Download: Full Case Study PDF

Abstract:

Interface is a pioneer in the use of biomethane to reduce carbon emissions at two of their carpet manufacturing facilities. Biomethane is made from methane captured at a landfill and injected into a common carrier pipeline. In the past, one Interface facility was directly connected to a source of biomethane, but the local supply of biomethane was insufficient to meet the needs of the entire facility. Interface partnered with Element Markets to identify a single source of biomethane that was injected into the natural gas pipeline and the environmental attributes were then matched with natural gas usage at Interface’s facilities in Georgia. A third-party verifier is used to confirm the Scope 1 emissions on-site, and the environmental attributes are applied on a 1:1 basis to achieve a zero emissions report to CDP for this facility.


The Electronics Challenge

2016 SPLC Leadership Award Winner – Public Interest Advocate

Organization: International Campaign for Responsible Technology & GoodElectronics Network

Contact: Ted Smith

Download: Full Case Study PDF

Abstract:

The Challenge to the global electronics industry to adopt safer and more sustainable products and practices and eliminate hazardous chemicals, exposures and discharges was developed in 2015 by The International Campaign for Responsible Technology (ICRT), GoodElectronics Network, and their allies, in an effort to protect and promote human rights, workers’ rights, and the environment in the production of electronics.


Building the Business Case for Sustainable Procurement in Australia – Guidance

Organization: ISO 20400 Australian Mirror Committee

Contact: Jean-Louis Haie

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Abstract:

The primary challenge for “sustainable procurement champions” in Australia (Chief Procurement Officers, Sustainability Managers, etc.) is to convince their organizations to embrace the ethical and commercial virtues of sustainable procurement. A very low proportion of Australian organizations are taking this topic seriously and investing in it!

This case study is about a pro-bono initiative between 10 Australian organizations from different backgrounds who have learned to work together through the development of ISO 20400: 2017 – Sustainable Procurement – Guidance. The diversity and high profile of organizations involved is a key success factor of this experience.

The product of this collaboration is a practical and impactful guidance document that will help sustainability and procurement professionals more effectively make the case for Sustainable Procurement in their organizations, covering all seven core subjects of ISO 20400: organizational governance, the environment, human rights, labour practices, community involvement and development, fair operating practices, and consumer issues.

The group also produced an editable version of the document, along with design guidelines, so that other groups can replicate this experience in their own countries.

The document received massive support in Australia and has already been downloaded hundreds of times on www.iso20400.org. Projects are being launched in Argentina and the UK to replicate our experience. This initiative has thus addressed a major gap in the market.


Johnson & Johnson Sustainable Procurement Program

Organization: Johnson & Johnson

Contact: Catherine Gross, Manager Responsible Procurement, Sustainable Procurement, Johnson & Johnson

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Abstract:

In today’s business environment, sustainable procurement practices are increasingly driving companies’ purchasing decisions, policies and reputation. With global operations and a large complex supply base, at Johnson & Johnson, we have an extensive reach and responsibility to influence the sustainability practices of our suppliers. For the last eight years we have highlighted and delivered on our commitment to partnering with suppliers who are transparent about their sustainability goals, can assure us that they are responsibly producing the goods and/or services we are buying, and can verify the legal and regulatory compliance of their supply chain. Through our most recent enterprise wide Citizenship & Sustainability program, Health for Humanity, we have committed to accelerate environmental and social improvements across our value chain and see our suppliers as key partners in this effort. Over our eight-year journey we have seen the results of our Sustainable Procurement Program pay off and pay forward. As we scale our program to engage more suppliers we continue to modify our internal processes and deployment to ensure we can meet our commitment to enroll suppliers covering 80 percent of spend in our Sustainable Procurement Program by 2020.


Solar Security Lighting for Metro Bus Shelters

Organization: King County

Contact: Karen Hamilton

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Abstract:

King County Metro Transit Division (“Metro”) has been installing energy efficient solar light-emitting diode (LED) bus shelter lighting systems to enhance passenger safety since 2005. Solar-powered lighting allows Metro to install lighted bus stops without the expense and construction of connecting the shelter to the regional power grid, and LED’s consume far less power than typical lamps. Metro currently installs approximately 50 units per year.

In past years, Metro’s rider/non-rider surveys reported that one of our customers’ biggest security concerns is with the wait at a bus stop in the dark, with personal security satisfaction dipping as low as 18 percent. We light the interior of all of our buses for the safety, security and convenience of our passengers, so “why shouldn’t a similar level of amenities apply to our passenger shelters?” In order to meet our customers’ needs, we should provide a bench, weather protection and lighting at all Metro bus shelters. In 2017 and beyond, we will improve security for Metro customers by installing solar lighting systems as a standard feature in nearly all Metro bus shelter installations, including new, refurbished and retrofitted bus shelters. In total, 150 new solar lighting systems will be installed per year in 2017 and 2018.


King County’s Long-term Renewable Electricity Purchase

Organization: King County

Contact: Karen Hamilton

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Abstract:

King County recently entered into a ten-year service agreement with Puget Sound Energy (PSE) to purchase wind-generated electricity from a wind facility in development in Western Washington. This voluntary renewable energy offering is called “Green Direct.” The service agreement commits King County to purchase Green Direct electricity beginning in 2019 for 98% of the County’s electricity needs in PSE’s service territory.

Purchasing renewable electricity through the Green Direct program is projected to reduce direct operational emissions from King County operations by twenty percent and catalyzes development of new renewable energy production in Washington State.


King County Metro Transit’s First All-Electric Battery-Powered Bus

2016 SPLC Leadership Award Winner – Purchasing Innovation

Organization: King County

Contact: Karen Hamilton

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Abstract:

King County Metro Transit is testing three quiet, zero emission, battery-electric buses to determine if this technology will meet the requirements to purchase 200 additional buses over the next five years. The buses have fast-charge batteries that can be recharged in less than 10 minutes. They are designed to operate up to 23 miles between charges and get the equivalent of 15 miles per gallon more than a regular hybrid coach. The buses have no engine, fuel system, engine cooling system, exhaust system or emissions treatment system, so maintenance and parts-replacement costs are expected to be lower than for diesel buses.

Metro is currently conducting a one-year test on their performance and efficiency as part of its normal operations. The buses are housed and charged on the Eastside at Metro’s Bellevue Base, and operate on routes throughout Metro’s service area. So far the tests have gone well and exceeded expectations. Metro has been putting the buses through their paces.

The first test operated one bus for 24 hours a day, 7 days a week for 105 days. Over 32,000 miles were logged in-city and on freeway driving with a weighted load. According to Climate Solutions, each of these electric buses will save Metro Transit as much as half a million dollars in fuel and maintenance costs over its lifetime—more than paying for the upfront investment that puts the buses on the road.


King County Metro Transit Fleet Purchases Advance Public Transportation Sustainability

Organization: King County

Contact: Autumn Salamack

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Abstract:

In 2004, King County Metro Transit (in Seattle, Washington) became the first large transit agency in the nation to purchase a fleet of hybrid buses, procuring 214 hybrids that run on electricity and ultra-low sulfur diesel fuel. Metro’s investment spurred the adoption of this technology by other transit agencies across the nation. Metro’s first hybrids reduced greenhouse gas emissions by 32 percent, achieved a fuel economy 31 percent higher than Metro’s diesel buses, and were 41 percent more reliable. Since that initial procurement, Metro has purchased hybrids with improved technologies. In 2014, Metro began purchasing hybrids with all-electric drive components and accessories. The new hybrids are up to 20 percent more fuel-efficient than the old hybrids they are replacing. Metro is also replacing its aged electric trolley fleet with new, state-of-the-art electric trolleys that can use batteries to run “off-wire” for several miles, reducing the need to substitute in diesel buses when events disrupt trolley routes. Metro teamed up with the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Authority on a single purchase contract to get highly competitive pricing. Today about 70 percent of Metro’s fleet is either hybrid or electric. Metro’s goal is to have a 100-percent hybrid or electric fleet by 2018. Metro also purchased all-electric, zero-emission Leaf vehicles for its commuter vanpool program, and procured three prototype fast-charge, battery-electric buses.


A Leading Light: King County Lighting Replacement

Organization: King County Department of Natural Resources and Parks

Contact: Wastewater Treatment Division – Resource Recovery

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Abstract:

To reduce the amount of electricity consumed in its plants and off-site facilities, King County’s Wastewater Treatment Division (WTD) engaged in an effort to change out its fluorescent lamps and High Intensity Discharge (HID) lighting to the more energy efficient, longer lasting, light-emitting diode (LED) lightbulbs. By replacing the standard lamps with LEDs, there will be a reduction in electricity use, costs will decrease, and the required maintenance hours will decrease because of the longer life of the LEDs. In this phase of the project, WTD chose to replace lamps that operated more than three hours a day, or over 1,000 hours a year. This effort began in 2014 and was completed in 2018. In total, the project is estimated to save 3.3 million kilowatt hours every year, which equates to $133,000 in electrical savings.


Purchasing Liquid Petroleum Gas Vehicles for King County’s Fleet

Organization: King County Department of Transportation

Contact: Karen Hamilton

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Abstract:

King County began its current liquid petroleum gas (LPG) pilot program in 2010 with an initial purchase of 10 units. Since then we have acquired an additional 12 vehicles. The first 20 vehicles were partly funded by an American Reinvestment and Recovery Act (ARRA) grant received through Clean Cities Coalition and the US Department of Energy. There were some compelling reasons for choosing LPG over other alternative fuels to replace some medium-duty vehicles in the fleet. The main consideration was that compared to gasoline and other fuels LPG reduces operational costs and lowers greenhouse gas emissions and other harmful pollutants. Overall the pilot project was a success. The vehicles showed that LPG will reduce GHG emissions in the fleet and although the energy content per gasoline gallon equivalent (GGE) compared to gasoline is less, the cost of LPG has resulted in significant savings in fuel spend.


Uncharted Waters: Waterless Car Washing Services in King County

Organization: King County Department of Transportation

Contact: Karen Hamilton

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Abstract:

As outlined in its Strategic Climate Action Plan, King County strives to minimize the use of resources and choose services with low environmental impacts. In accordance with this goal area, King County finalized a five-year contract in June 2017 with Ecoservice for vehicle cleaning services, after the Fleet Administration Division (Fleet) successfully tested it out on a pay-as-you-go basis. This innovative car washing service employs a “spray on, wipe off” method, using plant-based, environmentally-neutral cleaning agents. It saves an average of 33 gallons of water per car wash, which will conserve over 100,000 gallons of water during the course of the contract and reduce the amount of water wasted at Fleet facilities. Additionally, Ecoservice travels to established locations to clean several vehicles at once, reducing the amount of miles driven and greenhouse gases emitted.


Celebrating 30 Years of Sustainable Purchasing

2019 SPLC Leadership Award Winner – Individual Leadership

Organization: King County Procurement

Contact: Karen Hamilton

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Abstract:

Celebrating 30 years of efforts to reduce the environmental impacts of its purchases, King County has been a leader in this pursuit since 1989, when it established a policy to buy recycled-content products. In the interim years, the program has primarily focused on environmental aspects of products and services that are better for human health and the environment. In June 2018, based on direction in its Strategic Climate Action Plan, King County modernized these efforts, replacing its Environmental Purchasing Program with the Sustainable Purchasing Program. Instead of requiring buyers to think about one aspect of the product separately, the new policies and program take a more holistic approach to purchasing—balancing fiscal responsibility, social equity, and environmental stewardship.

To transition to this model, the sustainable purchasing team used a three-pronged approach: they updated the King County Code, they adopted a more robust Executive Policy, and they developed an online implementation guide to improve the understanding of the end users. The new policies focus on sending a transparent message to employees, suppliers, and other stakeholders that the County desires products and services that deliver key sustainability benefits and, that these benefits will increasingly be criteria in purchasing. Along with sustainable purchasing trainings offered to King County staff, these resources also provide county personnel with transparent information and technical assistance to help identify, evaluate, and purchase sustainable products and services. This transformation exemplifies the continuation of King County’s 30-year commitment to reducing its impacts on the environment.


King County’s Environmental Purchasing Program

Organization: King County’s Environmental Purchasing Program

Contact: Karen Hamilton

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Abstract:

King County, Washington’s Environmental Purchasing Program is 25 years old and has been able to bring about significant increases in the county’s purchases of environmentally preferable products by engaging the expertise of employees in the evaluation and purchase of alternative products. King County’s was one of the first programs in the country of its kind and had to forge ahead with only limited federal and state guidance on recycled products. By working internally with our end users and externally with other local, state and national leaders, we have lead, guided, shaped, influenced and taught “sustainable procurement” to others. We will continue to learn with the founding member work that we do with the Sustainable Purchasing Leadership Council. Lessons Learned – Full participation of the people who make purchasing decisions is the key to success.


Improving Program Effectiveness: Turning Data into Action

Organization: Lawrence Berkely National Lab

Contact: Anna Scodel

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Abstract:

Policies to leverage the market power of the U.S. federal government have established sustainable acquisition requirements but are only effective if federal buyers purchase and receive products and services that meet sustainability criteria. While individual agencies track procurements with varying methods, no database of U.S. federal purchases exists, which presents a challenge in measuring compliance with sustainable acquisition policies and understanding where support is needed. We developed a customized method to review federal solicitations posted to FedBizOpps – the centralized website where federal buyers are required to post large procurements. We found low compliance with energy efficiency requirements and are using our findings to improve the effectiveness of program offerings.


Cast a Wider Net: Advancing Inclusive and Sustainable Hiring

Organization: Lifeworks

Contact: Ashley Oolman

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Abstract:

In 2018 Minnesota-based Lifeworks Services supported the SPLC Summit in Minneapolis by staffing the conference and showcasing an inclusive hiring model. Ignited by Sam Hummel’s vision to expand the traditional understanding of sustainability, we accepted his invitation to show how disability inclusive hiring works.

Advancing employment opportunities for people with disabilities makes a direct impact on disproportionate rates of unemployment and poverty. Common misconceptions surrounding disability employment include how costly or challenging it may be. Data supports when companies hire employees with disabilities, they increase their competitive advantage. Inclusive hiring can raise a business’s bottom line, while increasing community engagement, ensuring equal opportunity, advancing human rights, and boosting the economy. Essentially, disability inclusive hiring promotes more equitable and sustainable communities.

Workforce diversification requires thinking differently which often reveals opportunity. These innovations can lead to increased productivity, collaboration and engagement while decreasing workplace injuries, open positions and turnover. When businesses ensure their workforce reflects their customer base, communities respond with greater brand loyalty. Simply put, inclusive hiring is a win for everyone. This case study explores how Lifeworks is leveraging relationships and expertise, to transform from being a service provider to an industry expert in the area of inclusive hiring.


Small Business Strong

Organization: Lockheed Martin

Contact: Ashley Rubinsky

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Abstract:

At Lockheed Martin, our commitment to supplier diversity has transcended into progressing sustainability efforts. Strengthening the DNA of our small businesses requires the building blocks of social, environmental, economic and ethical factors. There are two examples of Small Business Strong in 2016 that exemplify Holistic Sustainability Leadership. We unveiled a Comprehensive Mentor-Protégé program, looking at Mentor-Protégé in a whole new paradigm and providing more opportunities to small businesses. We also exceeded the DOD win rate for SBIR Technology Transitions, forging new ground and accelerating technology advancements in support of our customer’s mission. Combined, both of these efforts reflect our unwavering commitment to Small Business Strong.


Returnable, Reusable Containers and Fixtures

Organization: Lockheed Martin

Contact: Emily Hansroth

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Abstract:

Lockheed Martin innovates to continuously identify business practices that promote leaner operations and make products more affordable. This often involves partnerships with suppliers, since approximately two-thirds of major product platforms involve subcontracted components and parts. To this end, the company seeks responsible, sustainable solutions that simultaneously increase productivity, improve workplace safety and quality in production, reduce environmental footprint such as harmful emissions and waste sent to landfill – all the while meeting or exceeding delivery schedule expectations. By working with suppliers and production operations teams, Lockheed Martin harnesses returnable, reusable containers and fixtures (RRCF) to achieve these goals. An RRCF is a shipping apparatus or production aide that increases supply chain efficiency, production flow efficiency and eliminates waste in manufacturing. Similar to car sharing and unlike disposable packaging, an RRCF gets returned to the original location or supplier for reuse.


Better Plants Program

Organization: Lockheed Martin

Contact: Matthew Swibel

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Abstract:

The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Better Plants Program (BPP) is a voluntary program for industrial-scale organizations to join in order to garner necessary resources to help set energy efficiency goals and develop energy management systems. It is a key component of the president’s Better Buildings Initiative, which seeks to improve energy efficiency in U.S. commercial buildings and industrial plants. There are multiple benefits to becoming a member of the Better Plants Program, such as energy saving resources, in-plant trainings, receiving national recognition and technical support. Lockheed Martin is a proud member of the Better Plants Program and has been a member since its inception in 2009. Lockheed Martin was recently asked to partner with the DOE on their Supply Chain initiative, which is offered to Better Plants partners (UTC and Legrand are other partners that are currently participating). The Supply Chain initiative came to fruition because 40-60 percent of an industrial organization’s energy footprint is often from its supply chain. Therefore, the Supply Chain initiative extends the benefits of energy efficiency to the partner’s suppliers by helping them achieve energy and cost savings as well. Lockheed Martin successfully kicked off this new initiative with their critical small businesses in December 2015.


A Rewarding Precious Metals Spot

2016 SPLC Leadership Award Winner –Supplier Engagement

Organization: Lockheed Martin

Contact: Matthew Swibel

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Abstract:

Lockheed Martin prioritizes resource efficiency and circular economic principles in its manufacturing operations. Lockheed Martin’s precious metals reclamation efforts promote recycled content with gold and silver, divert hazardous waste and reduce demand rates for pollution-intensive mining activities. Over the past few years, Lockheed Martin has increased the number of precious metals reclamation waste streams by 250 percent, and are on track to divert over 20.5 tons of silver and gold in partnership with a Responsible Recycling − and ISO 27001−certified supplier. We actively promote these efforts in production floor redesigns and across our four business segments.


Supplier Diversity Program

2016 SPLC Leadership Award Winner – Supplier Engagement

Organization: Lockheed Martin

Contact: Matthew Swibel

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Abstract:

Lockheed Martin is committed to have a world-class Supplier Diversity program that provides small businesses with maximum subcontracting opportunities. Lockheed Martin understands that diversity and inclusiveness drive innovation and affordability and strengthen economic development. As the top prime contractor for the United States Federal Government, it is a natural part of our business strategy to involve small businesses in our efforts to locate sources of materials and services that will assist us in providing additional value for the customer, small businesses and Lockheed Martin products. However, Lockheed Martin’s goal is to support our small businesses above and beyond what is required by law and regulation. Our goal is more than a policy; it is a commitment to excellence and an integrated business practice that mirrors the diversity of the communities where we live and work. This case study focuses on Lockheed Martin’s relationship with small businesses, and how our efforts are not solely conducted because of federal government flow-down requirements. We see supplier diversity as a strategic business imperative to enhance competition, to invest in communities and strengthen economic development, while driving innovation and affordability.


Lockheed’s Sustainable Purchasing Program

Organization: Lockheed Martin

Contact: Matthew Swibel

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Abstract:

Over the past four years, Lockheed Martin executive leadership and procurement officials have collaboratively designed a sustainable purchasing program. They built the program by enlisting feedback from internal and external stakeholders, winning commitments from operating business segments and applying spend analysis findings to properly calibrate progress goals and tracking mechanisms. The program encompasses environmental, social and governance factors generating shared value for customers, employees, stockholders and society. These value drivers include expanded opportunities for small and disadvantaged businesses, the advancement of human rights and social wellbeing, the adoption of circular economic procurement models and capacity building for anti-corruption controls.


Lockheed Martin Spend Analysis

Organization: Lockheed Martin

Contact: Matthew Swibel

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Abstract:

A daring analysis by Lockheed Martin of the most costly environmental impacts of its supply chain and major products guides focused supplier engagement and investments highly aligned to core business goals. The three-stage analysis involved quantifying cradle-to-gate impacts to the environment and public health; creating a predictive database; and developing targeted co-investment opportunities with suppliers to generate additional net-positive impacts. The results showed that the impacts associated with product use and Lockheed Martin’s supply chain substantially outweighed the impacts occurring within its direct operations, both in environmental and financial terms. It informed new goal-setting and stakeholder engagement activities, and made leaders think systematically about product impacts and sustainable value. This prescient focus has taken on heightened relevancy as the company begins to apply the U.S. Department of Defense draft guidance on “Integrating Sustainability into DoD Acquisitions” which is derived from the standardized ISO 14040 Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) Framework to help address traditionally hidden costs, such as regulatory costs, contingent costs and pollution costs borne by society. From an environmental standpoint, direct operations represented less than 1% of total life cycle impacts.


Toward the Shared Value Vector: Lockheed Martin Sustainable Purchasing Program

Organization: Lockheed Martin

Contact: Matthew Swibel

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Abstract:

Over the past two years, Lockheed Martin executive leadership and procurement officials have collaboratively designed a sustainable purchasing program by enlisting feedback from internal and external stakeholders, winning commitments from operating business segments and applying spend analysis findings to properly calibrate progress goals and tracking mechanisms. The program encompasses environmental, social and governance factors that ultimately generate shared value for customers, employees, stockholders and society. These value drivers include expanded opportunities for small and disadvantaged businesses, the advancement of human rights and social wellbeing, the adoption of circular economic procurement models and capacity building for anti-corruption controls. Furthermore, Lockheed Martin now publicly discloses five performance indicators for supplier sustainability and several other performance indicators within its Sustainability Management Plan that influence purchasing practices. Specifically, the goals address elevated supplier standards for business conduct, conflict minerals due diligence, counterfeit components assessments, as well as complementary initiatives to responsibly purchase recycling services for electronic waste and precious metals recovered during manufacturing.


Sustainable Ethics Mentoring Program

Organization: Lockheed Martin

Contact: Lauren C. Schultz

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Abstract:

Lockheed Martin’s Supplier Ethics Mentoring Program, launched in 2012, aims to reduce the risk of ethics and compliance-related issues in the corporation’s supply chain by building the capacity of smaller suppliers. Through this completely voluntary program, Lockheed Martin Ethics Officers work one-on-one as mentors with select suppliers to compare the mentees’ ethics programs to the criteria of the Federal Sentencing Guidelines for Organizations (FSGO) and the Federal Acquisition Regulations (FAR), and benchmark them against the ethics program elements recommended by the Defense Industry Initiative on Business Ethics and Conduct (DII). The mentors also share best practices and internal resources, and provide recommendations to help the mentees establish or improve their ethics programs. By structuring a flexible yet comprehensive mentoring program, Lockheed Martin has been able to meet the needs of a wide variety of suppliers, from large to small, including providers of both products and services. Lastly, in order to reach a broader supplier population with limited resources, the program materials are available online for any supplier (or potential supplier) to access.


E-waste Stewardship

Organization: Lockheed Martin

Contact: Margaret Proul

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Abstract:

The twin forces of mass digitization and shortening product cycles for electronics carry lesser known environmental and social consequences at the end of their lifecycle. Unless properly recycled, a growing amount of electronic waste (e-waste) ends up in a dumping ground in China, Ghana, India or another developing country, where poor people eke out a living by smashing and burning the technology to extract the valuable metals inside such as copper and aluminum. The toxins poison the people scavenging for metal and pollute the water and air. E-waste contains hazardous materials such as lead, mercury and cadmium that can leach into soil and groundwater, and contains hazardous emissions when burned. Worse, there remains a large gap between e-waste generation and recycling. As the largest provider of IT services to the U.S. Government, Lockheed Martin procures personal and office electronic equipment for use in operations and at certain customer sites. The company undertook a three-pronged initiative to advance e-waste stewardship through new policies, procurement practices and awareness-building efforts with key stakeholders. The initiative also benefited our largest customer’s commitment to the responsible recycling of used electronics. The federal government requires (http://www.gsa.gov/portal/content/127503) U.S. agencies to reuse electronics as much as possible and dispose of non-functional electronics via e-waste recyclers that are certified by a third party. The results of the initiative included the adoption of new policies that mandate the use of e-waste recycling vendors that obtain third-party certification for responsible end-of-life management; a public commitment shared through business community and NGO channels; the creation of on-site employee engagement programs that led to the collection of 150,000 pounds of e-waste for responsible recycling; the development and release of a e-waste mobile app for kids that connects e-waste with principles of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education.


Standard Unlocks Sustainability

Organization: Lockheed Martin

Contact: Ashley Rubinsky

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Abstract:

In the aerospace and defense industry, product development cycles and product lifespans can last years and even decades. This means that the materials we select today must be viable for many years in the future.

To help us identify chemicals of potential concern used in our supply chain, Lockheed Martin collaborated with industry partners in 2018 to develop the standard IPC-1754: Materials and Substances Declaration for the Aerospace, Defense and Other Industries. IPC-1754 establishes requirements for exchanging product and process material and substance data between suppliers and customers. Lockheed Martin is working through IAEG (International Aerospace Environmental Group), of which Lockheed Martin is a member, and IPC® (Association Connecting Electronics Industries) to develop resources to support the use of the standard, thus promote improved efficiencies and data quality. Increasing the visibility of chemicals used in the supply chain will enable Lockheed Martin to better understand risks and support identifying less hazardous substitutes, which enhances the sustainability of our products.


Building Supplier Capability

Organization: Lockheed Martin Corporation

Contact: Ashley Rubinsky

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Abstract:

Sustainability is a key element of Lockheed Martin’s business model for innovation and growth. Connecting sustainability priorities to our business model is how we continue to grow as a global innovation leader and perform with excellence. Our emphasis on sustainability extends to our supply chain management strategy, since much of Lockheed Martin’s social, environmental and governance impact can be attributed to activities occurring throughout our supply chain.

We see business value in maximizing transparency into where and how products are made, which requires due diligence and strong partnerships across the value chain. We also recognize that managing finite natural resources, encouraging ethical business conduct, protecting sensitive information and addressing other supply chain risks is vital to the quality and profitability of our products.


Diversion, Reverse Logistics and Upcycling – the initial steps towards Circularity.

Organization: Looptworks

Contact: Scott Hamlin

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Abstract:

In 2018, Looptworks, a Portland, Oregon-based certified B Corporation, partnered with Delta Airlines on a global initiative to divert their retired uniforms from 65,000 employees from going to landfill. This abstract will dive into the influence of upcycling and closed loop solutions can have on purchasing of products used in the operations of every company. This case study reviews the steps taken and describes how these efforts help to not only divert 350,000lbs of uniforms from going to waste, but also how converting these materials into a tangible statement on sustainability initiatives, and the importance of employee engagement to realize goals. It describes the action steps that Looptworks and Delta Airlines are taking toward the Circular Economy.


John Ferraro Building Efficiency Case Study

Organization: Los Angeles Department of Water and Power

Contact: Maria Sison-Roces

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Abstract:

The Department of Water and Power’s (LADWP) adoption of sustainable practices demonstrates that being sustainable isn’t just good for the environment, but also for the bottom line. Practices that reduce consumption of both water and power ultimately translate into savings for customers and LADWP as well as avoided CO2 emissions which benefit everyone. The LEED certification of the historic John Ferraro Building (JFB) is the culmination of years of cross-functional efforts that leveraged energy and water efficiency. As a prerequisite for LEED certification, LADWP underwent an initial examination and update of LADWP’s Sustainable Purchasing Policy. This was made possible in part by the unified dedication by the Supply Chain to help achieve

As part of LA’s energy efficiency goals LADWP incentivizes its customers to implement efficiency practices while leading by example.


LADWP’s Evolving Sustainable Supply Chain Program

Organization: Los Angeles Department of Water and Power

Contact: Maria Sison-Roces

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Abstract:

As part of the City of Los Angeles, the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP) adheres to the LA’s Mayor’s Executive Directive No. 7, the Sustainable City pLAn. This sustainability plan sets the course for a Los Angeles that is economically prosperous, environmentally sustainable, and ensures equal opportunity for all. As LA’s municipal utility, LADWP is committed to providing reliable water and power in an environmentally responsible manner. LADWP is also carving new paths for renewable energy, local solar, energy efficiency, electric vehicle adoption, water conservation, and other measures aimed at reducing greenhouse gas emissions and getting us closer to carbon neutrality.

LADWP recognizes its role as a large consumer of goods and services. Our organization’s annual spend of approximately $2 billion has an environmental impact resulting from the combined effects of a product’s manufacture, distribution, use, and disposal. Ultimately, the purchasing decisions of LADWP and its contractors can positively or negatively affect the environment.

In 2014, LADWP adopted the City of Los Angeles’ Environmentally Preferable Purchasing (EPP) Ordinance which it uses to advance sustainable business practices. These practices have led to environmentally responsible purchases or practices that reduce both waste and costs while meeting critical performance and operational requirements.


5 Year Sustainable Procurement Strategy

Organization: McGill University

Contact: Stephanie Leclerec

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Abstract:

McGill University, a world leading research, teaching and learning institution, purchases approximately CAD $270 million of goods and services each year. Up until 2013, the University implemented only a few ad hoc initiatives to purchase “greener products”. Realizing that true advancement required a more structured approach, Procurement Services decided to lead a comprehensive Sustainable Procurement (SP) planning exercise. In 2013, we gathered a group of internal stakeholders, including faculty, staff and students from various departments and units, and developed a holistic 5-Y SP Strategic Plan. Our overarching goal has been to apply triple bottom line (social, economic, and environmental) principles, and lifecycle thinking to our procurement governance, processes, activities, logistics, and regular decision-making. The University has a full time Project Manager taking care of implementing the strategy.


Microsoft Contact Center Strategic Suppliers

Organization: Microsoft

Contact: Tim Hopper

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Abstract:

A Microsoft business group developed a consolidation strategy for procuring contact center services that was later determined by a recognized external source to be one of the largest ever supplier consolidating effort. In addition to streamlining Microsoft’s customer sales and support, the effort advanced a number of responsible sourcing goals:

  • Suppliers were contractually required to publish a GRI-based citizenship report and obtain 3rd party Environmental, Social and Governance certifications.
  • 100% of suppliers report on their emissions reductions goals and share their progress toward meeting these targets.
  • 45,000 disadvantaged learners have achieved a free Microsoft Digital Literacy Certificate.
  • The creation of over 5,000 Impact Employment jobs committed to by our suppliers

Climate Change Leadership through Collaboration and Capacity Building

Organization: Microsoft and CDP

Contact: Tim Hopper and Betty Cremmins

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Abstract:

Microsoft’s Responsible Sourcing team has made significant progress in reducing carbon emissions across the company’s vast indirect supply chain by driving collaborative innovations designed not only to measure and track emissions, but of equal importance to build capacity for improvement across Microsoft’s wide array of Suppliers.

Through the establishment of a long-term roadmap, the goals of the program are to drive awareness, inspire, and educate across the company’s global ecosystem of business and organizations on the impact of, and solutions to climate change. Initiatives Microsoft has collaborated on, sponsored, and led have begun to transform the way Suppliers tackle their carbon footprint, aligning billions of dollars of sustainable investors with the billions of dollars of sustainable purchasers.

At the core of these climate leadership efforts lies Microsoft’s support of the Sustainable Leadership Purchasing Council’s (SPLC) rigorous sustainability enterprise rating vetting process, and the subsequent establishment of CDP as the recognized global carbon reporting standard for Suppliers. Through Microsoft’s collaboration with, and sponsorship of both the SPLC and CDP, Suppliers of all levels, sizes, and geographies have access to a best-in-class tool that rate their climate change progress and enable them to make substantive changes to reduce their carbon footprint.

Finally, to recognize tangible emissions reduction efforts and inspire future improvements, Microsoft holds an annual Microsoft Supplier Program (MSP) Excellence Awards Program. This program recognizes superior performance, exemplary service, and innovation of suppliers that demonstrate their efforts towards the broader sustainability goals of Microsoft and its ecosystem.

Simply put, when it comes to CO2 emissions, this case study demonstrates how Microsoft 1) holds itself accountable, 2) provides the tools, incentives, and training for its supply chain to improve, and 3) continues to innovate across its supply chain to improve sustainability by leveraging the company’s core competencies and cutting-edge technologies.


Environmental Purchasing in Healthcare: Turning Big Data Into Useful Information

Organization: Mindclick

Contact: JoAnna Abrams

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Abstract:

For more than five years, healthcare purchasing decision makers have requested environmentally preferred purchasing data from suppliers of medical and non-medical products. Despite the collection of data for hundreds of thousands of items, and the expense to the supply chain, EPP information is not available to healthcare systems in the format needed to fit the purchasing process and inform their decisions.

This case study explains the challenges contributing to the lack of usable information for hospitals and demonstrates a solution for converting millions of EPP data points into analytics to benchmark current purchasing and improve performance while still meeting cost and quality requirements in the health care industry. An in-depth assessment of the impact of $1.5 million in purchasing at Edward-Elmhurst Health across three categories was completed, covering endotracheal tubes, furniture, and sutures. Approximately 50% of Edward-Elmhurst Health’s spend was on over 300,000 products that positively contributed to human and environmental health through reduced toxins, and packaging and production practices that reduce waste and greenhouse gas emission. In addition, we determined that $750,000 of spend was free of CA Prop 65 Chemicals, BPA, Latex, DEHP, PVC and Mercury. The remaining spend impact was unknown and could have a negative impact. To improve Edward-Elmhurst’s performance, the next step is to provide easily accessible EPP information for hundreds of thousands of products, and develop solutions for integrating this information into contracting and purchasing decisions.


mindful MATERIALS: collaborative transformation

Organization: mindful MATERIALS

Contact: Jennifer Atlee

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Abstract:

In fall 2018, PURCHASER piloted using the mindful MATERIALS (mM) Library as a resource to find and understand product sustainability data. PURCHASER requested that manufacturers add their data directly to the mM Library, a shared industry resource. New manufacturers have engaged with the mM Library, increasing its overall content by over 3% in under 3 months.

The mindful MATERIALS Library transforms the building product procurement process by providing all purchasers with consolidated, up-to-date material transparency and health and environmental impact information to enable informed decision making. A group of volunteers from across the building industry drive the initiative, operating collaboratively to define content and user experience, review product criteria and educate the industry about using the tool to save time and money.

With each PURCHASER project that uses the mM Library as a resource, clear market signals are sent to manufacturers and the pool of available data grows. Channeling requests for data through mM Library supports PURCHASER in efficient and informed material decision-making that aligns with sustainability objectives while simultaneously enabling others to optimize their purchasing processes by growing the shared data resource.


Molson Coors Advances Innovative Supplier Diversity Initiative

Organization: Molson Coors

Contact: Clayton E. Judge III

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Abstract:

The Five Forward Initiative of Chicago United promotes economic growth, development and prosperity – over five-year increments – by encouraging committed corporations to increase revenues allocated to local Chicagoland Minority Business Enterprises (MBEs). MillerCoors (a Molson Coors Company) has selected the following three Chicagoland MBEs for the initiative: 1) TechniSource Group, 2) MOTRGRAFX, and 3) PPOIC. MillerCoors intends to expand the scope and scale of its relationship with these companies, which should translate to growth in revenues and market potential.

During the first five-year engagement of Five Forward, significant capacity growth and job creation were realized among businesses. In addition, program participation enhanced the overall approach taken by MillerCoors to developing minority firms into business partners.

 


Select Supplier Sustainability Assessment

Organization: Monsanto

Contact:  Brenda Cockrell

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Abstract:

Monsanto developed a Select Supplier Sustainability Assessment (S3A) in 2015 to gauge our suppliers’ business conduct in the areas of corporate ethics and transparency, forced labor and discrimination, protection of human rights, and environmental footprint. This assessment allows us to engage our key suppliers from around the world in our collaborative commitment to sustainable agriculture. Through this initiative, we are able to enhance supplier relationship management efforts, assess opportunities and develop supplier specific plans that align with our Supplier Code of Conduct. Each year we have expanded the reach of our assessment by increasing our distribution by 52% in 2017 (compared to 2015), which touched 12.5% of our global addressable procurement spend, updating our supplier scorecard, and making the survey available in 3 languages.


Enterprise Resource Planning System RFP Project Management Team

Organization: Multnomah County

Contact: Shawn Postera

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Abstract:

Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) Systems need to fit the requirements of many business units. Often times, larger companies win this business because they offer solutions in every area, but that does not mean each area is the best fit for your organization. Multnomah County addressed this issue by completing each solution area separately along with a system integrator to ensure business needs were met. Importantly, this change ensured that small and medium sized companies could compete against large companies who typically would be awarded this software contract (because they offer solutions in all areas).


Sustainable Procurement in Laboratories: It’s Time to ACT.

Organization: My Green Lab

Contact:  Allison Paradise

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Abstract:

Recent years have seen an increased focus on sustainable procurement across a multitude of industries. Yet with little information or sustainability standards available for laboratory products, it has been challenging for procurement specialists and scientists alike to consider greener products in the lab. This is starting to change, however, due to the recent development of an eco-label – called ACT – by the non-profit My Green Lab. By evaluating and summarizing much-needed information on the environmental impact of the manufacturing, use, and disposal of laboratory products, the ACT label enables organizations to meet research goals while also satisfying broader institutional goals around carbon neutrality and zero waste.

With annual revenues exceeding $1.5 trillion globally, the life sciences industry is one of the largest in the world. At a local level, laboratory products account for 20-40% of all spend at organizations with research labs. There is an urgent need to address sustainable procurement in laboratories. As a result of increasing transparency around the sustainability of laboratory products, preliminary data suggest that the impact of the ACT label will be far-reaching in reducing energy, water, waste, and hazardous chemical use.


The New York State Green Procurement and Agency Sustainability Program

2017 SPLC Leadership Award Winner – Purchaser – Overall Program

Organization: New York State

Contact: Todd Gardner

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Abstract:

New York State has established an ambitious Green Procurement and Agency Sustainability Program under Executive Order 4 (EO 4) that directs state agencies and authorities to “green” their purchasing to make state operations more sustainable. EO 4 establishes an institutional framework – co-led by the Office of General Services and the Department of Environmental Conservation – to guide the state’s sustainable purchasing prioritization, standard-setting, and reporting activities. This interagency collaboration has created dozens of “green” specifications, which are serving as a valuable resource for purchasers developing contracts for commodities, services and technology. Additionally, in fiscal year 2014-2015, more than 80% of affected entities filed sustainability reports showing their progress towards meeting the EO 4 goals and documenting sustainability efforts. Other initiatives have led to a 50% reduction in solid waste generated and purchases of bottled water have been nearly eliminated.


NRG Energy: Creating value through supply chain transparency and engagement

Organization: NRG

Contact: Laurel Peacock

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Abstract:

In today’s global economy, virtually no organization is fully vertically integrated. This makes sustainability relevant across a company’s entire value chain. Corporations are acting to ensure their supply chains are transparent, resilient, and responsible both socially and environmentally. As a large power company, NRG’s supply chain activities largely consist of purchasing fuels and services to operate and maintain our generating units. Additionally, our retail electricity business relies on goods and services in the marketing and administration categories. As a valued partner to our commercial and industrial customers, we also must enhance transparency and sustainability performance to meet their higher exceptions in an increasingly competitive market.

To establish a strong foundation four our Sustainable Suppliers program, we’re focused on three key areas:

1) Assessing our supply chain risk. NRG worked with a third party to assess material sustainability risks and opportunities in our supply chain. The results from this assessment helped unearth potential hot spots for social and environmental risk and identify opportunity areas for collaboration.

2) Engaging in pre-competitive collaboration. In 2017, NRG joined the Natural Gas Supply Collaborative (NGSC), a group of companies representing 12% of gas purchases in the United States. This group strives to create responsible sourcing principles for purchasers of natural gas.

3) Creating responsible sourcing principles. This includes our manufacturing practices as well as our supplier diversity program. At NRG, we strive to maintain a position of leadership in supplier diversity among power generation companies by engaging with strategic business partners.


NSF 391.1 General Sustainability Assessment Criteria for Professional Services Standard

Organization: NSF International

Contact: Kianda Franklin

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Abstract:

The first sustainability standard for the professional services sector becomes a reality this spring after five years in development. The American National Standards Institute approved NSF 391.1 that provides a road map which the broad professional services sector can use to address environmental, social, economic and sustainable supply chain issues within the sustainability umbrella. This pertains to any organization that falls under the U.S. Federal Professional Services Schedule (PSS) or meets NAICS code 54 designation.

Development of the new standard has been facilitated as a sector consensus product by NSF International, an independent standards development organization, working in conjunction with a broad array of private and public stakeholders ranging from small and medium consulting firms, to large international enterprises, academia, state governmental entities, and both the US General Services Administration and the US EPA. The standard adopts the voluntary consensus, multi-stakeholder process preferred under US statutory procurement mandates and OMB (White House) sustainable procurement directives for federal agencies which purchase roughly $67 billion annually in professional services.

The new standard is distinguished by the complexity of the sector’s core business, the performance of human capital. Unlike a product-specific standard focused mainly on the physical composition and performance of a particular class of manufactured item, this standard focuses on the integration of many product items, materials, and uses together with social/economic conditions at the workplace and beyond and how they blend into the creation of the professional services performed. The standard incorporates by normative reference a range of sustainable product, material, supply chain, energy, human/labor rights, building and other physical and social attribute standards, principles and protocols all of which are woven into the fabric of the professional service provided. This standard will enable purchasers to better identify the suppliers continuously working towards sustainable solutions, as well as facilitate the vetting of suppliers’ supply chains to ensure their adherence to sustainable practices.


Expanding Sustainability in your Business System

Organization: Office Depot

Contact: Molly Ray

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Abstract:

In 2012, Office Depot began the creation of their ‘Green Army,’ now known as the Sustainable Business Development Team. This team was started largely due to the fact that there was a need for more awareness of the GreenerOffice program, including product reporting and other resource knowledge. Sales associates from across the US helped shape and build this team alongside the Sustainability department. The development of this team, along training and communicating sustainability more widely, led to an increase in sales of green products from 25% to 33% from 2015 to 2016.


Advancing Sustainability by Engaging Customers

2015 SPLC Leadership Award Winner – Supplier of Products and Services

Organization: Office Depot

Contact: Yalmaz Siddiqui

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Abstract:

The typical narrative around sustainable purchasing is that buyers establish criteria and goals, and then engage suppliers after they have decided what they want. But what if the paradigm was reversed? What if a supplier could switch from reacting to customer demand for more sustainable products and services, to proactively helping solve customer problems associated with sustainable purchasing?This case study will describe one company’s efforts to do just that. It will detail Office Depot’s 15 year journey to customer-centric sustainability – a journey that started reactively but ended proactively – not just for the company and its customers, but potentially for an entire marketplace. The lessons learned may inform all types of collaborations between suppliers and buyers, across many product and service categories. Download Office Depot Supplemental Materials


Creating Ownership for Sustainability in Large, Ever-Changing Organizations

Organization: Office Depot

Contact: Molly Ray

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Abstract:

In 2018, Office Depot undertook a ‘Year of Assessment’. This was prompted by a need to take a step back to evaluate the (15 year old) Sustainability program that has maintained initiatives and program amidst mergers, acquisitions and changes in leadership. The question needed to be answered, “Who Are We Today?” and “What Are Our Priorities?”. This involved a Materiality Assessment as well as the formation of a Sustainability Governance Council comprised of VP level and above leadership. The affect has been a noticeable shift in energy, visibility, communication, and direction for the program.


Using a Public Bond Measure and the Construction Manager/General Contractor (CM/GC) process to expand conservation education and instill sustainability throughout the Oregon Zoo

2019 SPLC Leadership Award Winner – Special Initiative

Organization: Oregon Zoo / Multnomah County

Contact: Kristin Shorey

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Abstract:

In 2008 voters of the Portland, Oregon tri-county region expressed the value they placed on animal welfare, conservation education and water, and energy conservation when they passed a Metro $125 million bond measure that funded habitat and infrastructure upgrades at the Oregon Zoo. This case study examines the implementation of the lessons learned in the first nine years of the bond’s planning and construction, into the final two to three years remaining to complete the work outlined in the bond program.

To help ensure that the public’s money was well spent, the bond measure mandated an Oregon Zoo Bond Citizens’ Oversight Committee (“the committee”) to provide independent citizen review. The committee produces a robust and thorough annual report on the bonds progress, operating at a high oversight level to ensure that the structure, expenditures, and defined goals of the zoo improvement program are on track. Excerpts from these annual reports form the basis of this case study.


PG&E’s Supply Chain Responsibility Program

Organization: Pacific Gas & Electric

Contact: Tiffany Rodriguez

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Abstract:

Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) enhanced their supply chain sustainability efforts by forming the Supply Chain Responsibility (SCR) team. This team focuses on sustainability via supplier diversity efforts, ethical supply chain, and environmental sustainability. Efforts include internal and external training, product category environmental focus, supplier code of conduct, and supplier environmental performance tracking.


Street Light Replacement

Organization: Pacific Gas & Electric

Contact: Tiffany Rodriguez

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Abstract:

The complementary initiatives of replacing PG&E-owned High Pressure Sodium Vapor (HPSV) street lights with Light Emitting Diode (LED) units and the company’s process of recycling old street lights exemplify the three pillars of sustainability in a value chain: environmental, social and economic value.


V-gard GREEN Hard Hat

2017 SPLC Leadership Award Winner – Purchasing Innovation

Organization: Pacific Gas & Electric

Contact: Tiffany Rodriguez

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Abstract:

In 2016, PG&E began sourcing V-gard GREEN hard hats made from sugar cane. These GREEN hard hats have all of the same qualities of a traditional hard hat with the added value of being manufactured from sugarcane ethanol which helps PG&E reduce its overall carbon footprint. Also, the GREEN hard hat absorbs less natural radon which has proven to be a time savings for the exit process at one of our power plants. The GREEN hard hat is slightly more expensive than the traditional, but has added value that support our goal of providing safe, reliable, affordable and clean energy – today and into the future.


PG&E The Sustainability Project Web-Based Tool

Organization: Pacific Gas & Electric

Contact: Tiffany Rodriguez

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Abstract:

In 2017, Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E) launched The Sustainability Project (TSP), a web-based tool to make it easier and more affordable for its suppliers to identify and adopt environmental best practices. TSP lets suppliers identify best practices relevant to their industry segment, benchmark with industry peers, get overall performance scores, and build an improvement plan prioritized by value. Content for this tool was developed in consultation with PG&E internal subject matter experts, suppliers, and industry experts. All involved had an interest in accelerating the uptake of best practices for transformative change in environmental sustainability.


PG&E Expands Sustainability Education for Suppliers

Organization: Pacific Gas & Electric

Contact: Joan Kerr, Dir of Supply Chain Responsibility and Tiffany Rodriguez, Expert Supply Chain Responsibility Program Consultant

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Abstract:

PG&E has a long history of providing training to current and prospective suppliers. Training topics focus on key initiatives such as safety, cyber security, and sustainability. Suppliers have expectations to meet relative to these topics. Diverse Suppliers Go Green was a training initiative launched by the PG&E Supply Chain Responsibility (SCR) team in 2010 to train small and diverse suppliers on how to develop and implement their own environmental sustainability initiatives.

In 2018, PG&E added two new training initiatives, Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Calculation and Supplier Code of Conduct. These initiatives were selected based on PG&E supplier expectations. Suppliers are expected to measure and reduce their environmental impacts, including GHG emissions, as well as operate in accordance with PG&E’s Supplier Code of Conduct (Code). Each training includes an in-depth look at the topic, business importance, class engagement activities, and resources for sharing the knowledge in their own company. Both trainings received positive remarks from attendees and will continue as part of our Technical Assistance Program.


PG&E Concrete Repair Innovation

Organization: Pacific Gas & Electric

Contact: Joan Kerr, Dir of Supply Chain Responsibility and Tiffany Rodriguez, Expert Supply Chain Responsibility Program Consultant

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Abstract:

PG&E has a culture of embracing change, innovation, and continuous improvement. This culture encourages collaboration, partnership, and speaking up. In 2016, PG&E identified a need to replace concrete foundation footers at some of its substations. A cross-functional team partnered to methodically develop an innovative and scalable solution that was affordable, environmentally conscious, and incorporated a diverse supplier solution.

The team developed a system and tools to assess concrete conditions and evaluated solutions. A diverse-owned business was selected to perform in-place concrete repairs that avoided the use of additional concrete, reduced project costs, and provided equivalent or better asset life extension. The project was piloted in 2017 and approved for future roll-out. At creation of the pilot, there were no other known foundation programs like this within the utility industry.


Carbon Neutrality: How Philips’ Procurement & Sustainability Teams Delivered Results

2016 SPLC Leadership Award Winner – Purchasing Innovation

Organization: Philips

Contact: Joseph Prendergast

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Abstract:

Philips’ approach to sustainability is rooted in decades of activities and experience in finding solutions that consider both the needs of people and the ecological capacity of the planet. Philips invests in improving operations and achieving our sustainability goals with innovative strategies that require a new way of doing business, moving away from the traditional linear economy towards a holistic, circular one.

In 2015, Philips’ Procurement and Sustainability groups worked together to develop a strategy to achieve carbon neutrality, a commitment the company made as part of COP21. The strategy included energy efficiency initiatives, deployment of onsite renewable resources, the purchase of renewable energy credits, and the purchase of a long-term power purchase agreement, which will allow the company to achieve carbon-neutral U.S. operations and reduce its global carbon footprint by 8.3%.

Already a leader in sustainability, the Philips PPA has helped the company take a leap forward in reducing the impact of its North American operations. This case study will outline the process Philips undertook to develop its cross-functional strategy to carbon neutrality, along with an analysis of PPA benefits and business case.


LEED-ing the Way to Market Transformation: Portland State University and Miller Paint

Business Case Leadership

Organization: Portland State University

Contact: Mark Wubbold

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Abstract:

Portland State University (PSU) is committed to economic, social, and environmental sustainability. Our Technical Design Standards require all major new construction and renovation projects to achieve Gold certification under LEED v4. These standards commit PSU to using sustainable products that are manufactured and sourced locally, and are verified as sustainable through industry guidelines or third party organizations. In accordance with PSU’s Sustainable Procurement Policy, materials with low “embodied emissions” are preferred. PSU seeks Health Product Declarations (HDPs) for materials that outline life cycle impacts and sustainable attributes.

Though standards and policies guide our sustainability efforts, PSU’s recently adopted Strategic Plan requires the university to “develop a strategy for leveraging our purchasing, employment, and investment priorities to advance equity, sustainability and community wealth-building.” This case tells the story of one instance of this strategy: our partnership with Miller Paint. In response to PSU requests for healthier paints and product transparency, Miller took the initiative to turn challenge into opportunity. They inventoried ingredients, screened paints against the Red List and provided HPDs to meet LEED v4 standards. By publicly disclosing their paint formulas, Miller satisfied PSU’s needs while positioning itself to compete in the expanding market for non-toxic materials and product transparency.


Partnering for Sustainability – Creating a Sustainable Supply Chain Collaboratively

Organization: Procter & Gamble

Contact: Andrew Butler

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Abstract:

When the World Economic Forum declared that by 2050, there is expected to be more plastic in the ocean that fish by weight, they put a call out to multinational corporations to be part of the solution. P&G answered that call by bringing together our critical suppliers to create a supply chain that addresses this issue. This case study describes one project that answers this call to action – the Head & Shoulders Beach Bottle – the largest run of recyclable bottles made from recycled beach plastic, was released in France in 2017. By not just engaging the two key supplier (TerraCycle and Suez)early in the project, and by giving them autonomy and resources, we developed this innovative bottle that has raised tremendous awareness about the issue of marine plastic. P&G is now leveraging our scale to use this same beach plastic approach in other regions (Latin America) and for other Brands (Fairy). In addition to be an environmental win, it also creates a social opportunity to drive a new economy around marine plastic collection.


The Railway Industry’s First Sustainable Procurement Initiative

Organization: Railsponsible

Contact: Chrisoph Karge

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Abstract:

Railsponsible is an industry initiative focused on sustainable procurement, with the aim to continuously improve sustainability practices throughout the railway industry supply chain. The initiative is open to all railway operators and companies across the railway industry value chain, along with key industry associations, that share its vision, mission and commitments.


Turning the Ship: How One Supplier’s Agility led to its Market Evolution

Organization: Renewable Choice Energy

Contact: Amy Haddon

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Abstract:

Renewable Choice Energy is a pioneering global supplier of products and services that advance clean energy development and carbon reducing technologies. The company is a recognized partner to more than 160 Fortune 500 corporations along with a generous cross section of the Global 500. The company recently made the strategic decision to shift its focus to include long-term renewable energy consulting in addition to its core product offerings of renewable energy credits and carbon offsets. This change has returned outstanding results for the company, which has grown to be one of the foremost experts on commercial renewable energy purchasing. This case study will describe the goals, process, and outcomes of this “turn of the ship,” relating how Renewable Choice identified its new direction and how it vigorously pursued new market and engagement opportunities with great success.


Right to Repair Case Study

Organization: Repair Association

Contact: Gay Gordon-Byrne

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Abstract:

The Repair Association has been at the forefront of promoting “Right to Repair” legislation for electronically enabled equipment, following the model of the auto industry. Without repair as an accessible option, any electronic gadget with a failed component will become instant electronic scrap at its first failure.

Repairs are possible for any manufactured product – but repair options may be limited by design or manufacturer policies blocking or preventing repair. Many sustainability efforts are aimed at changing design criteria – while the Right to Repair legislation is focused on preventing repair monopolies regardless of design.

Studies tell us that roughly 80% of the entire environmental costs of modern electronics are borne in production, not use. It therefore behooves everyone with an interest in sustainable manufacturing to make sure that they can amortize these heavy environmental costs over the longest period of time.


Model Green Lighting Equipment Contract

2019 SPLC Leadership Award Winner – Public Interest Advocate

Organization: Responsible Purchasing Network

Contact: Alicia Culver

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Abstract:

The Responsible Purchasing Network (RPN) teamed up with the City of San Francisco to develop a comprehensive Green Lighting Equipment Contract that promotes energy efficiency, reduces toxicity, ensures performance, supports local and disadvantaged businesses, and facilitates end-of-life management. An interdepartmental Lighting Green Team, consisting of the City’s electricians, sustainability and procurement staff, and RPN (a technical consultant with subject matter expertise in environmentally preferable lighting equipment), was formed in order to start the contract development process.

RPN developed specifications for six categories of lighting equipment: LED Lamps, LED Luminaires, Fluorescent Lamps, HID Lamps, Incandescent/ Halogen Lamps, and Ballasts. The specifications referenced credible sustainability performance standards (e.g., ENERGY STAR certification, the DesignLights Consortium (DLC) Qualified Products List, and the EU’s Restriction of Hazardous Substances (RoHS) Directive). RPN assigned minimum rated life and warranty requirements, and other criteria based on market assessments. RPN explained specifications and other key contract proposal provisions in a pre-bid meeting to increase the likelihood that bidders would adhere to them.

RPN identified responsive bids (i.e., those offering a full-line of products meeting SFApproved criteria). Each responsive bid was evaluated using both percentage discount and market basket assessments. Additionally, cost discounts were given to local and disadvantaged businesses.
This bid solicitation was highly competitive. Combined, the City received 85 bids across the six lighting equipment categories and issued intent to award letters for 26 responsive, low-cost bids.


Creation of a Multi-State Green Cleaning Supplies Contract by Massachusetts and New York State

2016 SPLC Leadership Award Winner – Purchaser – Initiative

Organization: Responsible Purchasing Network and Commonwealth of Massachusetts

Contact: Alicia Culver

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Abstract:

From mid-2014 until early-2015, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts teamed up with New York State and the Responsible Purchasing Network (RPN) to negotiate the nation’s largest, multi-state cooperative purchasing agreement for environmentally preferable cleaning supplies and equipment. The process entailed: – Analyzing historical spend data from the participating states to define the scope of the contract. – Creating model green janitorial supplies specifications and a market basket list of certified low-toxicity cleaners, hand soaps, floor maintenance chemicals, specialty cleaners, deicers, and janitorial paper products; recycled-content and certified-compostable trash bags, and high-efficiency vacuums and hand dryers.

Developing a vendor questionnaire to assess each firm’s green cleaning experience and training methods, and their product labeling, packaging transportation and recycling services. – Comparing Green Seal, UL EcoLogo and Safer Choice eco-logos based on dozens of criteria. – Evaluating over 30 bids to ensure compliance with the RFP specifications and identify firms offering the strongest qualifications and most attractive pricing. – Creating a user guide and promoting the availability of green cleaning products offered on the contract. – Tracking the preliminary results of the contract including approximately $2 million in cost savings due to contract discounts as well as significant toxics avoidance, water conservation, energy savings and other benefits to the participating states.


Creation of the USDN-RPN Sustainable Procurement Playbook for Cities

2017 SPLC Leadership Award Winner – Public Interest Advocate

Organization: Responsible Purchasing Network and Urban Sustainability Directors Network

Contact: Alicia Culver

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Abstract:

Cities spend billions of dollars through their procurement of goods and services, creating unique opportunities to generate a variety of sustainability benefits – both internally and externally. The Responsible Purchasing Network (RPN) teamed up with the Urban Sustainability Directors Network (USDN) to create a new resource, “The Buck Starts Here: Sustainable Procurement Playbook for Cities.”1 Some19 cities were actively enagaged in developing the Playbook over 18 months, and the Playbook was presented to over 60 USDN members via webinar and at the USDN annual meeting. This 200-page guide is helping cities, counties and other local governments to develop and implement more effective sustainable purchasing policies, programs, and practices, and to more easily track their results. It provides analytical tools; best practices; examples in electronics, fleets and building materials; spend analysis and implementation tips, case studies, and recommendations for city sustainability directors and teams interested in launching or strengthening their sustinable purchasing efforts. It can also be useful to other non-city purchasers. Many of the cities that participated on the Playbook team have started identifying opportunities to replicate the successes they learned about while participating in this project, and have begun implementing its recommendations.


Scaling the circular economy with modern asset management technology

2019 SPLC Leadership Award Winner – Circular Economy

Organization: Rheaply

Contact: Tom Fecarotta

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Abstract:

Using an organization’s surplus assets and resources should be the first step of any procurement decision, but the asset management tools to drive transparency, usage, and redeployment of such value assets are lacking. Organizations with reuse schemes, whether remanufacturing, recommerce or some other emerging concept in the circular economy, are doing their part to reduce carbon emissions and close material loops. Rheaply came to realize that in order for these reuse schemes to work across large organizations (and for the circular economy to be implemented at scale) there must be a way to increase the transparency of existing internal assets in the supply chain using better, cleaner, and more user-friendly technology. Rheaply developed the Asset Exchange Manager (or AxM), a modernized asset management technology to aid organizations in implementing the circular economy.

Through Rheaply’s AxM, Rheaply seeks to standardize and centralize an organization’s asset management process to empower any organization to harvest their internal resources before making any purchasing decision, by making the management, exchange, and tracking of assets more transparent. Rheaply’s programs additionally manage the resale or external transfer of surplus assets to ensure that less than 1 percent will end up in a landfill. This cloud-based SaaS platform enables users to score a win for the organization’s bottom-line as well as the environment.


Green Deal Circular Procurement

Organization: Rijkwaterstaat

Contact: Cuno van Geet

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Abstract:

The Dutch Green Deal on Circular Procurement proved to be a golden opportunity to connect public and private parties. Since 2014, the Green Deal on Circular Procurement has expanded from initially 18 public and private sector participants to become a broad coalition of over 45 government, businesses, social organizations and knowledge institutes. These have delivered in excess of 100 collaborative voluntary circular procurement deals that have helped close product and materials loops in construction, textiles, furniture, ICT and catering. ‘Green Deals’ are contracts between Central government and other organizations, intended to stimulate circular economy innovations and remove potential barriers, such as restrictive legislation. What is unique about this cooperation is that both public and private parties are represented within the Green Deal. The approach is now being replicated in other European countries including Belgium (Flanders region) and Finland. Denmark and France are also in the process of developing their own version.


Small Town ‘Rust Belt’ Economic Sustainability and Development

Organization: Roppe Holding

Contact: Ann Dougherty

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Abstract:

Roppe Holding Company is a manufacturer of interior construction products, based in the USA. The company is family owned, and has over 600 employees. Products made in four plants include wall base, resilient floor tile, and stair treads as well as wooden trim and handrails. More than 60 products are sold across North America and in Europe, including several products manufactured by suppliers. After supplying luxury vinyl tile to the Roppe Holding Company (RHC) customers for several years, supplier Nox Corporation of South Korea desired to construct a manufacturing facility in the United States. The owner of RHC offered assistance in acquiring a location and establishing a U.S. based operation. Initial discussions in 2013 led to the current Nox USA operation in Fostoria, OH, started in November 2015. The primary goal of this project was to ensure that the RHC supplier was producing product in the United States within 18 months, which was achieved.


Sustainable Supplier Performance – Increased transparency, collaboration and commitment drive structural impact

Organization: Royal Philips

Contact: Marcel Jacobs

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Abstract:

Royal Philips started to conduct supplier sustainability audits in 2004 as part of their commitment to be a responsible company. Supplier scoping was based on risk criteria such as risk countries and spend threshold (>€1Million). Since 2004, we conducted, through third party service providers, approximately 2,500 sustainability audits. During the execution of the audit program we identified industry specific non-conformities re-occurring at a large number of our suppliers in scope related to, for example, health and safety or remuneration and benefits.

We believed in the need for a structural change that goes beyond audit. Therefore, we designed and developed a new approach, SSP, thereby making our supply chain sustainable in every sense of the word, taking a systematic approach to improving the sustainability of our supply chain, driving continuous improvement and measuring impact through a structural, phased approach, focusing on collaboration and suppliers meeting agreed targets, and encouraging various stakeholders to join our approach. Managing improvements structurally over time requires a systemic approach, using a set of recognized and global references, an executable process, specific customized agreed actions, a set of KPI’s, ambitious targets and a group of suppliers in scope.


Transforming Commitment to Impact: How Shaw and the United Nations Global Compacts is Transforming Sustainable Sourcing

Organization: Shaw Industries

Contact: Diana Rosenberger

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Abstract:

In late 2017, Shaw Industries Group, Inc. took a significant step forward to transform business when the company both signed the UN Global Compact, and required all suppliers to adhere to the Global Compact’s Ten Principles of human rights, labor, environment, and anti-corruption via a new Sustainable Sourcing Policy.

The new policy also advances efforts to improve material health by requiring transparency and disclosure around identified chemicals of concern. Shaw’s raw material and finished goods suppliers are now required by purchase agreement to disclose the presence of any chemicals classified as a carcinogenic, mutagenic, and/or as a reproductive toxin. .


What if Carpet Never had to be Sent to the Landfill?

2017 SPLC Leadership Award Winner – Market Transformation
2016 SPLC Leadership Award Winner – Supplier Leadership

Organization: Shaw Industries Group, Inc.

Contact: Diana Rosenberger

Download: Full Case Study PDF

Abstract:

What if carpet never had to be sent to the landfill? Instead, what if it was made with safe, healthy ingredients that were assembled in a way that it could be reclaimed at the end of its useful life and re-used in the manufacturing of new carpet, over and over again, with no loss of performance quality?

Guided by principles that make up Cradle to Cradle®, Shaw designed a commercial carpet tile product known as EcoWorx® that could be responsibly recycled at its end of use.

Creating a carpet that could be recycled indefinitely without suffering any loss of quality, required a formulation devoid of traditional carpet backing ingredients such as PVC, phthalates and heavy metal stabilizers that interrupt the seamless flow of healthy raw materials back into the supply chain.

Transparency and confidentiality are fundamental elements of Shaw’s strong supplier relationships and sustainable sourcing efforts in designing and manufacturing EcoWorx®. In addition to the product itself, the industry’s first win-win take back program was essential to ensure connection to the circular economy and diverting carpet from the landfill.


Sodexo: Local Sourcing as a Pathway to Impact Sourcing

Organization: Sodexo

Contact: Judy Panayos

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Abstract:

It is more important than ever for organizations to do well by doing good. Sodexo is using its scale to advance local sourcing from the communities where we operate, along with the economic, social, environmental and health benefits that follow. The following case study outlines how Sodexo’s local sourcing of produce in the Chicago area leverages partners across the supply chain to positively impact the community of Chicago.

Specifically, Sodexo, Northwestern University, Midwest Foods, and the Chicago Botanic Garden with its Windy City Harvest program are partnering to support small, local Chicago businesses and farmers by leveraging Sodexo’s purchasing power to create demand for local products. We are, in practice, initiating a multiplier effect as our producer partners scale their businesses; provide career development opportunities for at risk community members; increase access to affordable and nutritious choices for food desert communities; and support local sustainability efforts.

Sodexo incorporates local sourcing into the purchasing categories that lend itself to that model, including produce and other food products. Our industry typically assesses the impact of local sourcing in terms of the monetary infusion to the local economy, measured by the percentage of total spend. However, this project highlights how taking a more holistic approach to evaluating impact is more meaningful given the profound effect a relatively small percent of institutional spend can cause when well placed. In this way, a deliberate, partnership-based model of sourcing can support long-term economic, social, environmental and health benefits to our communities.


Sodexo’s Vermont First Program: Growing Market Opportunity for Local Producers

Organization: Sodexo

Contact: Annie Rowell

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Abstract:

In 2014, Sodexo launched the Vermont First program, a commitment to the state of Vermont to increase local food purchasing at all of Sodexo’s Vermont accounts, working with our business partners and the communities in which we live and work to support Vermont’s local economy. Through strategic purchasing; collaboration with stakeholders; training and enabling our operators; and increasing consumer awareness, Sodexo’s Vermont First program aims to grow market opportunity for local producers, stimulate job growth, and ensure the viability of Vermont’s working lands.

Specifically, Sodexo spent $2.8 million on local products statewide in 2018 alone. We convened over 30 stakeholder meetings and sponsored events as well as an Advisory Board and multiple focus groups that bring together Vermont food system stakeholders to solve the challenges of farm to institution. We have enabled our operators across Vermont to successfully demand plan, promote, and track local products, while also engaging 143 attendees at Taking Root Student Symposium to prepare and inspire students to pursue a career in Vermont’s food system.

Sodexo’s Vermont First program is the first of its kind, where a food service company has committed to leverage statewide spend and resources for local purchasing and growing local partnerships. Since 2014, Vermont First has become a widely revered best practice in local purchasing not only for its transparent and scrupulous local tracking system, but additionally for how the program engages statewide stakeholders to provide guidance and direction to steer local purchasing to the needs of local producers.

Perhaps one of the greatest outcomes of Vermont First is that Sodexo uses the experience to intentionally replicate this model in other regions. Through this framework, we actively seek opportunities to leverage our purchasing capacity in the communities where we operate to make a positive social, economic and environmental impact.


Supplier Engagement at Sonoco

Organization: Sonoco

Contact: Renee Paris

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Abstract:

Sonoco has increased their focus on sustainability in the past several years. After some success with the supplier diversity team, Sonoco created the supplier sustainability team in 2008, the year after publishing their first sustainability report. This small team has been headed by Marc Ensign since its inception and has undertaken many initiatives in its short history to engage suppliers as fully as possible. Working together with the corporate sustainability group, the supplier sustainability group’s efforts have helped Sonoco to stay on the Dow Jones Sustainability Index a record seven years straight.


Measuring What Matters: Using Innovative Product Performance Evaluation Software

Organization: Sphere E

Contact: Deborah Dunning

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Abstract:

Three leading architectural firms critiqued the Sphere-E software designed to support diverse building professionals in materials assessment and product specification. Architecture 2030, Centerbrook Architects and Skidmore, Owings & Merrill reviewed the BETA software and provided suggestions for enhancing it usefulness in efficiently selecting the most sustainable products in the global marketplace. They found the system for data quality ranking, leadership benchmarking and data visualization to offer productive processes not available in other tools. Most participants in this case study noted that transparency is more valuable when combined with the kind of product performance data vetting and analytics provided in this software system. Ed Mazria, Founder of Architecture 2030 has written, “Sphere-E is a product that promises to give design professionals the embodied carbon information they need, and it is an exciting example of the progress we’re making towards the transformation of the built environment.” Download Sphere E Supplemental Materials


Integrating EPP into California’s eProcurement Process

Organization: State of California

Contact: Charleen Fain-Keslar

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Abstract:

The State of California has deployed its new Financial Information System for California (FI$Cal) implementing standardized financial management processes and systems across all state agencies and departments. The Department of General Services, Procurement Division (DGS PD) developed and implemented a module that provides an Environmentally Preferable Purchasing (EPP) program to track EPP in the state’s spend and report EPP progress.


Open Office Panels System

Organization: State of California Department of General Services

Contact: Charleen Fain-Keslar

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Abstract:

The Department of General Services (DGS) Procurement Division (PD) is the centralized purchasing division for the state of California government and it is responsible for procuring various commodities and services. The Environmentally Preferable Purchasing (EPP) unit within the PD’s Engineering Branch is responsible for implementing environmental and sustainable specifications into the procurement contracts. PD in collaboration with a multi-stake holder team of experts from DGS Real Estate Services Division, California Environmental Protection Agency departments and California Energy Commission developed the solicitation for a $6 million statewide contract for modular office furniture which included the evaluation of the environmental performance of the products as well as the sustainability of the supply chain. Bidders were scored on the basis of their bid price and the environmental attributes associated with the offered products and supply chain. One of the most notable mandatory environmental requirements of the RFP is the indoor air quality (IAQ) specification which limits the emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from the modular furniture. The targeted VOCs are based on the Reference Exposure Limits (CRELs) for toxic individual VOCs. Besides the mandatory IAQ specification, the RFP included scoring criteria to incentivize bidders offering products that meet more stringent or advanced requirements than the regulatory minimums or the industry averages. The more notable scoring criteria include LED task lighting, reduction of toxic materials, and post-consumer recycled content. Additionally, the RFP also included optional administrative requirements for recyclable shipping materials, end-of-life management program, greenhouse gas reduction, use of renewable energy and corporate environmental management system


State of California’s Leadership in Sustainable Purchasing

Organization: State of California Department of General Services

Contact: Janice Yonekura

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Abstract:

Over several decades the State of California has lead the Nation in honoring its commitment to protecting the environment and supporting social and economic development. The phrase “State of California” is for many, synonymous with the word “leader”. In its leadership the State has ingrained the same principles as those recognized by the Sustainable Purchasing Leadership Council (SPLC). The State understands it must reach out to a diverse group of stakeholders to gain support for the programs they govern. California aims to achieve sustainability goals quicker with greater results in partnership with private and non-government agencies through innovative actions.
Download State of California’s Sustainable Purchasing Program Supplemental Materials


Combined Approaches for Increasing Diversity and Inclusion

Organization: State of Minnesota

Contact: Betsy Hayes

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Abstract:

Minnesota has had programs to support businesses owned by socially or economically disadvantaged persons for over forty years. However, demographic data continues to show disparities in multiple areas, including public contracting. In January 2015, Minnesota Governor Mark Dayton issued Executive Order 15-02 (updated as EO 16-01) establishing the Diversity and Inclusion Council to improve the recruiting and retention of state employees from diverse backgrounds, improve the contracting process for businesses owned by Minnesotans from diverse backgrounds, and promote civic engagement in the State of Minnesota.

In response to the executive order and expanded authority granted by the state legislature, the Minnesota Department of Administration, through its Office of State Procurement (OSP), undertook multiple initiatives to promote greater equity in its contracting processes. By pursuing multiple approaches simultaneously, the state hopes to show benefits in the near term while also addressing the need for systemic change. Among the approaches, the OSP created and delivered an innovative training program to state agency procurement staff, made process changes, and expanded outreach significantly. The OSP is monitoring progress, and continues to explore new approaches for improving its contract process and outreach efforts.


Interagency Collaboration on Sustainable Purchasing

Organization: State of Minnesota

Contact: Johanna Kertesez

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Abstract:

In 2011, Minnesota Governor Mark Dayton signed Executive Order 11-13, directing state agencies to implement new practices and policies that save money and reduce the environmental impact of state government operations. Under this order, agencies create annual sustainability plans that identify specific, measurable goals. The purchasing-specific goals established in 2011 addressed office products purchased by all state agencies: copy paper, toner cartridges, and imaging equipment.

Strategies to achieve the goals included incorporating sustainable purchasing requirements in state contracts, working with contract vendors on aggressive pricing, and conducting education and outreach to purchasers and end users. All three purchasing-specific goals were achieved, yielding significant environmental benefits and cost savings. Interagency collaboration was critical to reaching the goals. The Pollution Control Agency, the Department of Administration, and the Interagency Pollution Prevention Advisory Team (which includes representatives from 20 additional government organizations) worked closely to implement the strategies and ultimately reach the goals. Key learnings include the importance of gubernatorial leadership, the necessity of data collection, as well as the utility of incorporating sustainability directly into state contracts.

One of the most important outcomes of including purchasing-specific goals in the executive order was the creation of new momentum for the State’s Sustainable Purchasing Program. The executive order allowed the state to efficiently address a contaminant of emerging concern, triclosan, through government purchasing requirements, and in turn spurred the State to work on strengthening the existing program.


Building the sustainability capacity of small, minority, woman, economically disadvantaged, and veteran-owned businesses

Organization: State of Minnesota

Contact: Johanna Kertesz

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Abstract:

The State of Minnesota’s Sustainable Procurement Charter recognizes that state procurement must balance environmental, social, and economic priorities. The establishment of this charter in 2017 highlighted a gap in the State’s sustainable procurement efforts – namely, if the State intends to achieve these goals concurrently, more work needs to be done to develop the sustainability capacity of small, minority, woman, economically disadvantaged, and veteran-owned businesses. The barriers and challenges related to environmental sustainability requirements faced by these businesses must also be addressed. To address this gap, the State collaborated with the SPLC on a workshop to help small, minority, woman, economically disadvantaged, and veteran-owned businesses remain competitive on state contracts with environmental sustainability requirements. The workshop was also designed to identify barriers facing these businesses. Input collected via workshop surveys and evaluations, through conversations during small group breakout sessions, and from post-workshop communications from attendees is being used to inform next steps for building the sustainability capacity of suppliers.


Establishing a Formal Sustainable Procurement Program

Organization: State of Minnesota

Contact:  Johanna Kertesz

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Abstract:

The Department of Administration’s Office of State Procurement (Admin-OSP) and the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) collaborated on an informal Environmentally Preferable Purchasing (EPP) program since the late 1990s. In an effort to create a more holistic program that reflects the State of Minnesota’s priorities for diversity & inclusion, environmental sustainability, and fiscal responsibility, Admin and the MPCA established a Sustainable Procurement Charter. This document set the foundation for the State’s sustainable procurement program including roles, responsibilities, resource commitments, priorities, goals, and accountability for all cabinet agencies to support the program by engaging in contract development and using sustainable contracts. It also established a new sustainable procurement framework that will be applied to all future contracts prioritized for sustainability improvements. The State of Minnesota spends approximately $2.5 billion in goods and services each year and many public entities also use contracts established by the state. Therefore, this new and improved program will likely lead to significant positive change.


Sustainable Office Furniture on NASPO ValuePoint Participating Agreement and MINNCOR Industries Contract

Organization: State of Minnesota

Contact: Melissa Peck

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Abstract:

The State of Minnesota partnered with the Center for Environmental Health (CEH) and Clean Water Action-Minnesota to help state furniture purchasers identify healthier furniture options. These products are provided by the six vendors awarded a contract with the NASPO ValuePoint contract for Office Furniture, as well as the Minnesota Department of Corrections industry program (MINNCOR Industries). All of the healthier products were already offered on contract and therefore are considered cost-neutral.

In pursuit of sustainable procurement goals identified in Executive Order 17-12, the State adopted a Participating Agreement that provides health protective restrictions on five key chemicals of concern that have documented indoor air quality, environmental, and/or health concerns.

Individuals spend on average 87% of their time indoors,1 so tackling indoor furnishings is an important step in improving the indoor air quality and health of Minnesota’s workforce. Minnesota used a tiered purchasing approach to prioritize the purchase of furniture free of formaldehyde and other volatile organic compounds, antimicrobials, flame retardant chemicals, polyvinyl chloride, and fluorinated stain-resistant chemicals. These chemicals are commonly referred to as the “Hazardous Handful” or as the chemicals targeted in the “Healthy Interiors Challenge”.


Energy-Efficient Purchasing Tracking

Organization: State of Tennessee

Contact: Andy Kidd

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Abstract:

The State of Tennessee, through the Central Procurement Office (the CPO), is committed to supporting initiatives directed towards reducing the state’s energy costs and environmental impact. In order to achieve this goal the CPO has prioritized the need to identify and create contracts that make energy-efficient product offerings available. To fully assess the savings and environmental impact of these contracts, a standardized tracking and reporting process was necessary.

To facilitate improved understanding on if the state was achieving its savings goals, the CPO started an initiative where a team analyzed potential solutions to standardize the tracking and reporting mechanism. The team created a solution that resulted in more accurate and detailed reporting by utilizing existing software that could be easily modified as information on sustainable purchasing behavior came to light. Moving forward, this allows the office to identify and implement a comprehensive energy-efficient purchasing strategy to be used by all state agencies.

As a result of the solution’s implementation, the CPO now has a mechanism in place to track energy-efficient purchasing by a host of criteria; agency, vendor, time period, etcetera. In turn, the office has been able to set new standards and policies related to its purchasing habits and track its goal progress.


Leading Human Rights Due Diligence in Global Supply Chains Through Public Procurement – the Case of the Swedish County Councils and IT Supply Chains

Organization: Stockholm County Council

Contact: Anna Hagvall

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Abstract:

Leading human rights due diligence in global supply chains through public procurement – the case of the Swedish County Councils and IT supply chains

In 2013 DanWatch came out with a report on poor labor conditions at four suppliers in China delivering to Dell and other IT brands. The report initiated a long-term engagement process between Stockholm County Council, Dell and its reseller Atea to remedy the labor rights violations. The process led to increased transparency and substantial improvements in Dell’s and Atea’s supply chain responsibility and helped build the Swedish County Council’s internal capacity.


Superior Essex West Baden Springs Hotel

Organization: Superior Essex

Contact:  Melanie Singleton

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Abstract:

When the Cook Group decided to restore the atrium and historical dome of the West Baden Springs Hotel, a new customized lighting solution was required. The project had four goals: to reduce energy use, to simplify operations and lighting control, to improve the safety of ongoing operations and maintenance, and to respect and enhance the historical architecture of the immense atrium. To meet these goals, Superior Essex partnered with Platformatics to create a customized lighting solution using innovative physical infrastructure, and purchasing leading lighting technology, resulting in an increase of 98.5% in energy efficiency, improved safety, and preservation of the architectural integrity of this iconic space.


Supplier Capacity Building: A Collaborative Pilot Using the Sustrana Platform

Organization: Sustrana

Contact: Jennifer Anderson

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Abstract:

In January 2017, Sustrana launched a jointly developed pilot program in collaboration with a large utility company (the “customer”) to enhance their supply chain sustainability efforts. Five suppliers in the program receive subsidized access to the Sustrana platform, a robust online software application that helps companies build and implement a sustainability management plan. The primary goal of the supplier capacity building program is to support customer efforts to improve their diverse SME suppliers’ sustainability competency, performance, and capacity so that the suppliers operate and deliver products and services more sustainably. As a result of this program, the purchaser/customer has access to leading indicators regarding supplier progress and engagement on sustainability, and the supplier gains access to valuable tools that improve the efficiency and effectiveness of their sustainability efforts. Quarterly reports provided to the customer enable more concrete information upon which to make future purchasing decisions.


Form Policy to Progress Measuring Social Responsibility Improvement in IT Product Manufacturing

Organization: TCO Development

Contact: Clare Hobby

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Abstract:

TCO Certified is the most comprehensive sustainable certification for IT products, including computers, tablets and other devices. For 25 years, TCO Certified has offered purchasers an independently verified tool for reducing risk and meeting sustainability challenges connected to electronics. Since 2009 TCO Certified has included criteria for socially responsible manufacturing, and a 2016 impact study reveals major improvements in code of conduct compliance in factories manufacturing certified products. Results include a reduction to zero nonconformities in several key parameters.

Findings show:

  • Major improvement in code of conduct compliance in facilities manufacturing for 16 brands.
  • A new brand-collaboration model for driving faster factory progress
  • Continuing, industry-wide problems connected with local labor law

TCO Certified, generation 8. Helping IT purchasers drive product circularity, chemical transparency and supply chain responsibility.

Organization: TCO Development

Contact: Clare Hobby

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Abstract:

The 8th generation of TCO Certified was launched in December 2018 with the goal of providing IT purchasers with a verified tool that allows them to directly affect supply chain conditions, take a more circular approach to the product life cycle, and support the UN Sustainable Development Goals.

TCO Certified is a global, independent sustainability certification for IT products, and incorporates a broad set of criteria for environmental and supply chain responsibility. Independent verification is carried out in accordance with ISO 14024 and 17025.

The research, development, and multi-stakeholder dialog behind this generation has delivered much-needed transparency around chemical content and pathways to safer substitutions, a first set of criteria to support circularity along with further focus on supply chain responsibility, and expanded coverage of conflict minerals criteria to include cobalt.

The case study looks at achievements during the three-year development cycle, including:

• Development of criteria that help purchasers take a more circular approach to IT products, focusing on extended life length and re-use;

• Creation of first public list of independently assessed flame retardants and plasticizers – going beyond banning chemicals;

• Expanded monitoring of supply chain responsibility and correction of factory non-conformities, including expanded criteria for responsible mineral sourcing and first criteria around process chemicals.

TCO Certified is used by IT purchasers worldwide as an independent tool to drive social and environmental responsibility connected to IT products.


Tessy Plastics, A Supplier’s Sustainability Journey Stg

Organization: Tessy Plastics

Contact:  Cindy M. Bush

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Abstract:

This case study tells the story of how Tessy Plastics went from “zero to hero” in their sustainability journey, a journey sparked in 2010 by a poor CDP submission result and propelled further by a negative EcoVadis assessment score. In five short years, Tessy Plastics would take a 180-degree turn and transform themselves into a model sustainable supplier, set a new bar for contract manufacturers’ sustainability performance worldwide, and experience tremendous growth and prosperity as a result.

Tessy has reported to the CDP on Climate Change and Water Management for several years. For the 2016 reporting year, Tessy achieved scores at the Leadership level with an A- for both Climate Change and Water Management. As an essential part of our Environmental Management System, Tessy has continually worked on waste reduction and other targets. Employee engagement in our waste reduction program is a key factor in the program success. Due to the level of engagement, Tessy has achieved a 51% reduction in waste since 2012. Using their work in the CDP and Ecovadis assessment, Tessy Plastics was able to build a strong, sustainable Environmental Management System and has been ISO 14001 certified since 2013. In 2018, Tessy adopted three of the UN Sustainable Development Goals.


Collaboration Drives Sustainability, Efficiently, in the Chemical Industry

2016 SPLC Leadership Award Winner – Market Transformation

Organization: Together for Sustainability and EcoVadis

Contact: David McClintock

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Abstract:

Together for Sustainability (TfS) is an industry collaboration focused on driving sustainability improvements in the chemical industry supply chain. TfS brings together industry players (so far 16, having added three new members since October 2015, and several more in ‘onboarding’) in the chemical industry to adopt a harmonized set of assessment and audit processes, running on a common platform to achieve measurable CSR performance improvements in its supply chain.


Ecolabel Builds Synergies Between Value Chain Actors to Accomplish Sustainable Procurement Goal: A Case from Telecom Industry.

Organization: TUV Rheinland

Contact:  Fallight Xu

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Abstract:

Green Product Mark is an ecolabelling program operated by TÜV Rheinland, which has been recommended by US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as a multi-attribute ecolabel to use in US federal procurement.

Deutsche Telekom (DT) builds a trusting relationship with more than 30,000 suppliers in over 80 countries. DT’s ambition in attaining sustainable development goals along its supply chain starts from the bid phase where sustainability is weighted 10%.

The Green Product Mark is one of the instruments used by DT to align the efforts of actors on its value chain in achieving sustainable development goals. To induce the shift of consumers to a more sustainable lifestyle, DT explicitly communicates the environmental preferability of its products at points of sales (e.g. Amazon) by featuring the endorsement of Green Product Mark. On the other hand, to mobilize its suppliers to offer more sustainable products and services, DT resorts to Green Product Mark in building the common understanding with its suppliers toward sustainable products. To develop products that could comply with Green Product Mark requirements, DT’s suppliers also bring their own suppliers of components and parts into the game by adopting Green Product Mark certification criteria as part of the binding contract clauses.


The USDA Voluntary Biobased Labeling Program

Organization: U.S. Department of Agriculture

Contact: Mark Sajbel

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Abstract:

In 2011, USDA implemented a Voluntary Biobased Labeling Program for qualifying biobased products as a result of Congressional legislation originating in various Farm Bills. The USDA Certified Biobased Product label is designed to help purchasers identify products with biobased content and to assure them of the accuracy of this content. Biobased products are derived from plants and other renewable agricultural, marine, and forestry materials. These products provide an alternative to conventional petroleum-derived products and include a diverse range of offerings such as lubricants, detergents, inks, fertilizers, and bioplastics. USDA contracts with the organization that certifies the standard for biobased content, ASTM, making the certification process easy and affordable to encourage companies to submit candidate products. And this process has worked: over 2,200 products are carrying the USDA Certified Biobased Product label since the program’s inception. USDA also has an audit program, whose purpose is to monitor both the validity of the participants’ certified biobased content claims and the proper usage of the label in the marketplace. By creating a bigger market for biobased products, USDA carries out the main goal of the legislation, which is to help the rural economy. Selling more biobased products may also have the additional benefits of reducing our nation’s dependence on petroleum and decreasing adverse environmental and health impacts, subject to current lifecycle analysis constraints.


U.S. Department of Energy GreenBuy Award Program

2015 Leadership Award Winner

Organization: U.S. Department of Energy

Contact: Josh Silverman

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Abstract:

The Department of Energy’s (DOE) GreenBuy Award Program recognizes that not all environmentally preferable products are created equal and that an awards program provides an incentive for purchasing products that are the “best of the best.” The GreenBuy Priority Products List (PPL) identifies the “best of the best” environmentally preferable attributes of available products and enables purchasers to select products that go beyond compliance to make greater contributions to energy and water efficiency, waste minimization, toxic chemical reduction, and human and environmental health protection.All Federal agencies are required to purchase environmentally preferable products. These are products that demonstrably use less energy and water, reduce or eliminate waste at the source, promote the use of nontoxic or less toxic substances, implement conservation techniques, and reuse materials rather than put them into the waste stream. The marketplace responded forcefully to the purchasing requirements for such products, which greatly increased the range of environmentally preferable products from which Federal purchasing agents could choose.Selecting any of these products would comply with the Federal requirement. DOE personnel believed, however, that mere compliance was not enough and that a system could be developed to help purchasers select the most environmentally preferable products from the hundreds available. Although awareness that strategic purchasing would have a greater contribution to human health and environmental protection, was itself a powerful incentive for their procurement, DOE recognized that an awards program could serve as a useful secondary motivation. Thus was born the DOE GreenBuy Award Program.


UN Environment: 10 years of action to accelerate the shift to Sustainable public procurement at national, regional and global levels

Organization: UN Environment

Contact: Farid Yaker

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Abstract:

The involvement of UN Environment in the Sustainable public procurement (SPP) area dates back from 2005 when our organization joined, from its inception, the Swiss-led Marrakech Task Force on SPP; one of the 7 task forces established in the framework of the Marrakech Process on sustainable consumption and production (2003-2012). The Marrakech process, initiated in Marrakech in 2013, prepared and gave way to the 10-year Framework Programme on Sustainable Consumption and Production (10YFP), adopted at the Rio+20 2012 summit.


Sustainable Procurement

Organization: United Nations Development Programme

Contact: Estitxu Berroja

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Abstract:

UNDP works in about 170 countries and territories, helping to achieve the eradication of poverty, and the reduction of inequalities and exclusion. The agency helps countries to develop policies, leadership skills, partnering abilities, institutional capabilities and build resilience in order to sustain development results.

UNDP focuses on helping countries build and share solutions in three main areas:

In all our activities, we encourage the protection of human rights and the empowerment of women, minorities and the poorest and most vulnerable.

In order to fulfill its mandate and achieve its vision of empowered lives and resilient nations, UNDP must procure a significant volume of goods and services. As a public organization entrusted with donor funds and committed to supporting developing economies, UNDP works to improve access to quality assured supplies in a cost effective and reliable way.


University of California – Sustainable Procurement Policy Updates, Quantitative Metrics, Governance Structures and Approval

Organization: University of California

Contact: Heather Perry

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Abstract:

During 2016-18, the University of California (the UC) undertook a complete re-write and consensus approval for its Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Policy (the Policy). Changes to the Policy include a broadened focus, quantitative goals and governance and ownership of the sustainable procurement function. The broadened policy focus includes consideration of Economically and Socially Responsible (EaSR) procurement. Quantitative goals are set for green spend, EaSR and an innovative new metric called “the dollar not spent.” The policy also addresses minimum sustainability criteria for solicitations to address vendor practices.
In the new framework responsibility for setting targets and measuring results resides with UC procurement staff and leadership and dedicated staff time has been allocated to the task by procurement leadership at each campus.

The updated governance structures and new policy serves as the framework for system wide progress against quantifiable sustainable procurement goals. It also provides the platform for training procurement staff, system-wide flagging green products and EaSR suppliers in e-procurement platforms. The project provides a framework that will limit duplication of tasks across UC campuses as well as harness economies of scale and scope by addressing a shared vision for sustainability across the UCs addressable spend.


Procurement & Sustainability Partnership: Energy Efficient Research Freezers

Organization: University of California, Office of the President

Contact: Hilary Bekmann

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Abstract:

Since 2003 the University of California (UC) has pushed laboratory equipment manufacturers for energy efficiency breakthroughs, especially for ultra-low temperature (ULT) freezers, which may use the equivalent electricity of an American home. To address high energy consumption rates, two manufacturers recently developed efficient freezers that use half the power of standard models. UC sustainability officers then verified these energy savings, and reliability was reviewed by a regional service provider.

One of the efficient freezer suppliers offered advantageous pricing and business terms, so that its energy efficient freezer became the UC’s favored model, without the need for internal or external rebates. Procurement officers then partnered with sustainability colleagues across ten campuses for a three-month campaign. Several campuses hosted ULT freezer kick-off events, with promotional flyers co-developed with the supplier. One campus sent emails to over 1,500 researchers and departmental procurement staff while the supplier handled requests for quotes, transactions, and delivery. During the 2016 promo period, over 70 ULT freezer units were sold across ten campuses, and the offer has since been extended into 2017. On top of favorable freezer pricing, a few campuses offered the customer additional energy-efficiency rebates. If all campuses had done so, the UC would have accelerated its conversion to energy-efficient models. With a University goal of climate neutrality by 2025, adoption of efficient ULT freezers is crucial to success.


A case study of the Biochemistry Cell Culture Facility at the University of Colorado Boulder: avoided costs and other benefits resulting from shared equipment in collaborative research space

Organization: University of Colorado, Boulder

Contact: Christina Greever, CU Green Labs Program Assistant / Theresa Nahreini, Cell Culture Facility Manager / Kathryn Ramirez-Aguilar, PhD, CU Green Labs Program Manager

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Abstract:

University laboratories are large consumers of resources including energy, water, material goods, chemicals, and space, and therefore present tremendous opportunity for reducing the environmental and fiscal footprint of research, particularly through the procurement of such resources. With scientists experiencing intense competition for research funding, efficiency and cost-saving measures benefit both the scientist and the institution. The CU Green Labs Program at CU Boulder has been studying our Biochemistry Cell Culture Facility (BCCF) as a successful example of shared equipment in collaborative research space that could be emulated elsewhere. Our resulting case study demonstrates that the BCCF—which is utilized by 16 laboratories and 70 individuals across three departments—results in substantial cost avoidance, a smaller environmental footprint, and is beneficial to the culture of science on our campus. A key ingredient is a high-quality manager, through whom lab material and equipment purchases occur to centralize requests and reduce waste, as well as enable the lab to purchase materials in bulk and further reduce costs. Other cost-saving factors inherent in a collaborative research space include efficient equipment procurement. We estimate that the facility is providing a cost avoidance of $253,000 per year to CU Boulder with $195,000 per year of those avoided costs realized directly by scientists and the Biochemistry Division, and $58,000 per year realized by campus management. This case study demonstrates that a shared cell culture facility can provide qualitative benefits and significant avoided costs to scientists and their academic institutions.


Ultra-Low Temperature (ULT) Freezer Efficiency Program

Organization: University of Pennsylvania

Contact: Colleen Reardon

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Abstract:

The University of Pennsylvania’s Ultra Low Temperature (ULT) Freezer Efficiency Program aims to reduce the number of old, under-utilized, highly inefficient freezers, and has incentivized replacement through the purchase of energy-efficient ULT freezers. ULT freezers have become approximately 75% more efficient over the past six years. The goal of the program is reduce building energy consumption by replacing underutilized and old freezers with new models. The program was developed through the collaboration of the University’s Green Campus Partnership, Perelman School of Medicine, and Purchasing Services. This program is funded by Penn Facilities and Real Estate Services’ Energy Reduction Fund (ERF).


Anchor Institutions and Small Businesses Implementing Sustainable Solutions

2017 SPLC Leadership Award Winner – Supplier Engagement

Organization: University of Pennsylvania & Wash Cycle Laundry

Contact: Joel Hommes & Mark Mills

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Abstract:

This case study demonstrates what was achieved through a business relationship with a small business (Wash Cycle Laundry) and a large anchor institution (University of Pennsylvania) that is seeking to work with local partners. Wash Cycle Laundry is a certified Minority Business Enterprise and Small Business based near the University. It provides upwardly mobile job opportunities for vulnerable job seekers, and processing and delivering laundry in the most sustainable way possible. This case study describes a unique partnership between the University of Pennsylvania’s Penn Strategic Sourcing department and supplier Wash Cycle Laundry, which ultimately led to an important contract and relationship being formed with a large and important client, Hilton’s the Inn at Penn, job creation, and a more sustainable laundry service.

The case study demonstrates it is possible to achieve significant results searching for actionable opportunities without first needing to raise significant funding to support a comprehensive initiative. It also demonstrates the value of long-term strategic approach to supplier development and engagement.


U.S. Forest Service Region 5 Carport-Mounted Solar Photovoltaic System: A Lesson in Aggregated Procurement

Organization: USDA Forest Service

Contact: Lara Buluç, Sustainable Operations & Co-Climate Change Coordinator, Christopher Corpus, Regional Electrical Engineer/Energy Manager, Renee Jewell, Commercial Services Program Manager and Procurement Analyst, & John McLaughlin, Regional Mechanical Engineer

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Abstract:

The U.S. Forest Service Region 5 Regional Office Carport-Mounted Photovoltaic (PV) Project, completed over a 5-year span from 2013-2018, was part of the Federal Aggregated Solar Procurement Pilot (FASSP). The FASSP was selected as a segment of the White House GreenGov Spotlight Communities Program. Included in this FASSP are other Federal organizations such as the U.S Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the U.S. General Services Administration (GSA), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), as well as two DOE National Laboratories—Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. In an effort to reduce internal agency overhead costs by sharing procurement and project management resources, the FASPP team developed a contracting solution (i.e., a Power Purchase Agreement or PPA) designed to take advantage of economies of scale in solar installation, with no up-front cost to the government. FASPP demonstrates a nationally replicable process whereby Federal agencies leverage their combined purchasing power to procure on-site solar energy more efficiently, while saving money on utility bills. This was the first Federal partnership to aggregate the purchase of solar power using a third-party financed civilian agency PPA.


Corporate Paper Program

Organization: VF Corporation

Contact: Ellen Blake

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Abstract:

In June 2005, VF identified an opportunity to drive more sustainable purchasing behavior and realize value for the business through the implementation of a corporate paper program. Veritiv (formerly Xpedx) was selected as the supplier to manage the VF paper program. VF print suppliers were directed to purchase paper through the paper program for VF Brand print projects. By January 2014, the direct paper purchases of VF office papers were included in the paper program.

By directing both 1st and 2nd level procurement through the paper program, we have:

  • Greater transparency into paper use throughout VF
  • Leveraged scale for preferential pricing across all paper needs (direct and indirect)
  • Leveraged program data to drive and achieve corporate sustainability goals.

Cleaning Products

Organization: VF Corporation

Contact: Maria Antoniacomi

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Abstract:

Cleaning products has been a challenging category for VF EMEA given its high fragmentation across the local teams in Europe, Middle East, and Asia (EMEA) countries. The main challenges have been ensuring visibility, cost control, health & safety standards compliance and quality. To tackle the challenge, we took a holistic approach by drafting an RFP in collaboration with the Sustainability and Health Departments. We initiated the efforts in Belgium, where we consolidated spend with one supplier. This enabled full compliance with our sustainability and health safety requirements, but also delivered 20% to 30% savings. Given the positive results, the same process will be followed in other EMEA countries.


Fabric Scrap Recovery

Organization: VF Corporation

Contact: Vanessa Vila

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Abstract:

VF Corporation’s internal manufacturing in Mexico produces various waste streams, including on average 7,500 tons of fabric scrap waste per year. As part of our Sustainability and Responsibility strategy to guide the company’s transformation changes and create business value, VF partners externally to ensure 100% re-use of its fabric scrap. Fabric trimmings are collected and re-used across various industries including: the automotive sector (fabric or liner for automobile carpets, interior and trunk liners), mattress manufacturing, banking (printing paper money), apparel (new denim from 100% cotton scrap), shipping (thermal products for food and beverage shipments), and construction (acoustical insulation).

The benefits include:

  • Scrap can be reused, recycled, or repurposed, avoiding ending up in landfills
  • VF receives compensation for scrap, instead of paying for waste collection services
  • Leverage fabric scrap relationship to re-purpose other waste such as: cardboard, plastic, wood pallets, junk, and zipper-fly scraps.

Indirect Procurement Sustainability Program

Organization: VF Corporation

Contact: Blaine Babb

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Abstract:

VF Corporation is one of the largest apparel and footwear companies in the world, with more than 30 brands, 65,000 associates, and operations in more than 170 countries. Indirect Procurement’s annual spend is over $1.2 billion globally and with this scale comes the responsibility and opportunity to lead towards a more sustainable future as outlined by a quote from Steve Rendle.

“While we’ve been in business for 118 years, it’s clear that our obligation to operate our business with the highest social and environmental standards has never been greater. Our consumers demand it; our associates, business partners and communities expect it; and our planet needs it.” Steve Rendle, VF Corporation Chairman, President & CEO

While VF’s Sustainability & Responsibility actions and initiatives are industry leading, a leadership that has earned VF a place among Barrons 100 Most Sustainable Companies, we felt that as VF’s Indirect Procurement Organization we could do more to align our day to day work with the Company’s sustainability goals. ​In December 2017, VF Corporation established an ambitious Indirect Procurement Sustainability Program to guarantee sustainability is top of mind for all future sourcing activities. VF Corporation recognizes that a well-designed Sustainable Purchasing Program can reduce costs while helping to meet organizational sustainability and responsibility goals to align with the company’s purpose statement “to power a movement of sustainable and active lifestyles that benefit people and the planet”.

This case study focuses on VF Corporation’s development of an Indirect Procurement Sustainability Program which will be incorporated in three phases during the 2019 fiscal year. This program contributes to the core purchasing principles of VF: transparency, integrity, value for money, quality, openness, fairness, competition and accountability.


Travis Perkins Group Multiple Sustainability Impact Spend Analysis

2015 SPLC Leadership Award Winner – Supplier of Sustainability Services

Organization: VitalMetrics/IERS

Contact: Sangwon Suh and Daniel Girdler

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Abstract:

Travis Perkins Group has supplied the UK and Ireland building and construction trades for more than 200 years. In 2011, we carried out a first assessment of our scope 3 carbon impact. By running a spend analysis and mapping our purchase ledger data in detail to the rigorously peer-reviewed CEDA® datasets, we were able to allocate an initial carbon footprint based on our spending with suppliers across multiple product categories. In 2014 we commissioned the production of a more detailed scope 3 research report, delivered by VitalMetrics (formerly IERS), again using CEDA®. This report examined multiple environmental impacts across our total group’s purchasing, and segmented the analysis by all of our business divisions, suppliers and product categories. Crucially the study calculated water use, energy consumption and waste production, as well as GHG emissions. This comprehensive additional research allowed the business to understand the wider environmental impacts of the products it purchases. Results showed that although the business procures thousands of goods and services from over 2,000 suppliers, a small number of product categories contribute to a high proportion of the supply chain’s environmental impacts. Namely: Lime and Gypsum products, Cement, Heating Equipment and Polystyrene Foam products. These alone represent 65% of scope 3 carbon emissions, 31% of water consumption, 44% of energy use and 50% of the supply chain waste generation. The scope 3 research has equipped us with a comprehensive knowledge of the impacts of our spending; which is now helping us to prioritize actions to reduce the environmental impacts of our supply chain as quickly as possible.


U.S. General Services Administration Spend Analysis

2015 SPLC Leadership Award Winner – Supplier of Sustainability Services

Organization: VitalMetrics/IERS

Contact: Sangwon Suh

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Abstract:

U.S. General Services Administration (GSA) commissioned VitalMetrics (IERS LLC) to conduct a comprehensive environmental Spend Analysis (SA) for federal spends and identify options for improving procurement procedure to reduce their environmental impacts. With over $500 billion annual expenditure, the U.S. federal government is ranked as the single largest purchasing entity in the world, and its leadership in sustainable purchasing has the potential to transform the economy across the border. Using CEDA, an environmentally extended input-output LCA database, and structural path analysis (SPA), the structure of environmental impacts associated with the US federal government spends were analyzed. The results shows that non- residential construction such as road, bridges, and other infrastructures constitutes the largest environmental impacts among US federal government expenditure. The electric utility sector was responsible for the most significant amount of the overall impact from supply-chain processes. The findings from this work helped inform GSA and other federal government branches to improve the environmental performance of their purchases. While the first of the two projects were performed prior to the publication of the SPLC guidance document, both of the two projects closely follow SPLC’s guidance demonstrating its applicability to a very large organizations with complex spend data.


Setting the Industry Standard: Implementing Environmentally Preferred Attributes Across Healthcare

2019 SPLC Leadership Award Winner – Supplier Leadership

Organization: Vizient

Contact: Cristina Indiveri

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Abstract:

There is significant confusion in the healthcare industry regarding what defines an environmentally preferred product. Many healthcare organizations do not know which top trends to request regarding their products while the majority of suppliers fail to grasp what to prioritize for research and development. Vizient has asked for the group purchasing organization industry to adopt one standardized set of environmentally preferred attributes to create transparency and expedite change towards safer products. By adopting one uniform set of attributes, healthcare organizations, manufacturers, and group purchasing organizations can collaboratively work together to ensure health care providers do not inadvertently harm those who they aim to heal, and protect the environment for future generations.


Zero Waste Challenge

2016 SPLC Leadership Award Winner – Supplier Leadership

Organization: Waste Management

Contact: Raymond Randall

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Abstract:

Waste Management has worked on a variety of events in which they have effectively implemented their Zero Waste Challenge. From regional summits to national conferences to major sporting events, the strategies that WM has executed have proven successful in improving material inputs, reducing landfilled waste, and properly managing material inputs and outputs that resulted in substantial waste diversion rates.


Corporate Value Chain (Scope 3) Standard

Organization: World Resources Institute & World Business Council for Sustainable Development

Contact: Cynthia Cummis

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Abstract:

The Corporate Value Chain (Scope 3) Standard, published by Greenhouse Gas Protocol in 2011, enables a company to measure and report indirect emissions from its value chain, such as emissions from suppliers, distributors, and product use. The standard includes 15 categories of value chain (known as “scope 3”) emission sources, both upstream and downstream of their operations. Typically, scope 3 emissions are responsible for the majority of total corporate emissions. By accounting for these sources, companies can identify significant opportunities for reducing their carbon footprint. For example, this insight can drive companies to do business with greener suppliers and customers. Since publication, accounting for scope 3 emissions sources has become a growing practice; 78% of companies that report emissions to CDP report at least one scope 3 category, 38% of companies report 5 or more categories, and13 % report 7 or more categories (which likely represents a complete inventory) . Another indicator of the uptake of the standard is that more than 500 organizations have used the Scope 3 Evaluator, a tool to estimate full scope 3 emissions.